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Joe Marconi

Hold a Clinic for your Customers

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Last week we held two consumer clinics for women. Both were a huge success. I spoke about the importance of car maintenance, safety, what to do if you have a break-down and gave them many more tips. I expected the clinic to last about an hour or so, but went on for over 2 hours.

 

The clinic was so successful that I am already planning another one in July for teen drivers and students going back to college.

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