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COVID 19 Resource Links and Information


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Hello everyone, I am suggesting we have a thread with comments that only relate to information regarding help for businesses or communities affected by recent events.

 

I will start the thread by listing relevant links I have at this time:

the U.S. Treasury Department has released a draft application for the Paycheck Protection Program (the
new forgivable loan program) created by the CARES Act. The Paycheck Protection Plan application process starts
Friday, April 3, 2020 and those eligible and interested in applying should begin that process as soon as possible:


- For a top-line overview of the program:
https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP -- Overview.pdf


- If you’re a borrower, more information and links to SBA lenders http://www.sba.gov/ can be found here:
https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/PPP--Fact-Sheet.pdf


- The application for borrowers can be found here:
https://home.treasury.gov/system/files/136/Paycheck-Protection-Program-Application-3-30-2020-v3.pdf


Importantly as well, we have included links to Small Business Administration (SBA) resources that will help navigate
the government subsidies, loans and programs available:


- The SBA’s Local Assistance Page, https://www.sba.gov/local-assistance which provides local resources and
information on offices and other resources around the country;


- Lender-Match, https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans the SBA’s tool to find local banks and lenders
based on your needs and;


- SBA’s Coronavirus Resource Page:
https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/coronavirus-relief-options

 

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