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Joe Marconi

You can compete with online part companies

Recommended Posts

I can't tell you how frustrating it is to give a price on a radiator to a customer at the service counter, while he's on his phone searching for the part!  

Here's what I do when I get a customer that tell me he can get the part cheaper....I agree with him!

I let him know that he can get the part cheaper, just like he can buy a steak and potatoes cheaper at the super market too.  But he'll pay more for the steak and potatoes at a restaurant. 

And then in a calm manner, I review all the benefits of me suppling the part, the warranty and the fact that if the part is wrong or defective or fails in the future, he will have no recourse and will have to pay to have done all again. 

For most, it works. For many it's all about price.

Now Most IMPORTANT IS THIS: The reason why you don't mind spending more for a steak at a restaurant is because of the experience. So, make sure the customer experience clearly demonstrates the value of why people need to do business with you. When Value goes up, price becomes less of an issue.

Hope this helps. Let's hear from you on this frustrating topic! 

 

 

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