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  • Similar Topics

    • By spencersauto
      What's your houlr labor rate and where are you located? We're currently at $95 in Texas
    • By ASOG Podcast
      Brian Walker of Shop Market Pros explaining what makes them different at the TOOLS Conference 2021.
    • By carmcapriotto
      Bob Cooper, Founder/President of Elite Worldwide Inc. A native Ohioan, Bob started his career as a technician in a struggling, Cleveland Ohio shop that he later purchased and build into one of the most successful shops in America. As a successful shop owner and experienced drag racer, in Cleveland, he started a second business and began doing performance driveline work for many of the nation’s top fuel racers. It wasn’t long after he and his family sold their Cleveland home and businesses, loaded up their race car, and moved to southern California where he developed shops that gained national recognition.
      Having a passion to help other shop owners, in 1990 he founded Elite; the industry leader in helping shop owners build more profitable, successful businesses, that allow them to reach their personal goals, and elevate the industry at the same time. Bob was one of the first to predict the dealership's plan to target the service business, he predicted the trend toward maintenance, the explosive growth in remanufactured components, and the trend in leasing. He is also the creator of the most commonly used sales procedures used by the top service advisors in America.
      He has been nominated for entry into “Who’s Who in American Business”, he is a member of the prestigious National Speakers Association, he is recognized as one of the nation’s leading authorities on both personal and career success, and he is committed to the principle of never putting money ahead of people. In addition to speaking at many of the major industry events, he has spoken worldwide to many Fortune 500 companies, private banking groups, universities and the United States Army.
      Listen to Bob's other episodes HERE
      Key Talking Points
      Why we all need to have clearly defined goals- establish your goals for the next year. Only 3% have defined goals. People that have goals are happier, healthier, and live longer lives. They earn on average twice the income vs the people who don’t have goals. Most people don't know what they don't know- 97% of people talk about their day-to-day lives and don’t talk about goals. People also don’t know how to set goals, fear of failure and fear of rejection.  We are born with 2 genetic fears- falling and fear of loud noises, all other fears are developed fears. Many are faced with a fear of public speaking, which is a developed fear as well.   Was the day successful or not successful with reaching goals Short-term goals are not used for economic gain- the purpose is to change the behavior of people. Make yourself wonder what you could do differently to reach the goal next time. Short-term goals should be daily goals. In order for short-term goals to effectively influence behavior, they only need to be reached 51% of the time. Monthly goals- the problem is you’re only rewarded for hitting that goal once every 30 days. You also risk slowing down if reaching the goal early or giving up if not close to hitting goal.  Increasing sales 15% - set daily sale goals and daily car count goals, always make sure they are tracked in descending not ascending way. If your goal is $5,000 for the day and you sell $1,500, draw a line through $5,000 and rewrite $3,500. It is a new adjusted goal. Goals should always be in front of you instead of what you’ve accomplished.  Write your core beliefs, what are the things that are most important to you? 8-10 core beliefs. Look at it 2-3 days later and constantly work on it for the next month. You cant set effective goals if you don’t first know who you are as a person. Share your goals with a spouse/someone who fully supports you, find the common goals together. “Give up goals” can be shared with everyone.   Hiring employees is like getting married. Getting married is easy, staying married is hard. Don’t let your employee “fall out of love” with what they are doing. Don’t be afraid to set breathtaking goals, realistic goals for short-term and mid-term goals. Long-term goals should be life-changing/inspiring. “Given the difference in creativity and intelligence, I will always opt for creativity. Because anything mankind can imagine, mankind can create.” Albert Einstein Goal Setting Checklist found HERE  
      Connect with the show:
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partner:
      The NAPA Smart Sign, previously known as Digital Menu Board, gives your shop a professional, state-of-the-art look and feel. It’s a great way to educate and inform your customers about needed repairs and service, plus increase awareness of your current promotions. NAPA AutoCare Center that have installed a Digital Menu Board found one out of five consumers ask for a repair or service they’ve seen on the board. Targeted promotions resulted in double-digit increases. You choose the content from a library of auto care service and repair topics. The latest NAPA national promotions are downloaded to you automatically. And with the Digital Menu Board it’s easy to change your services, prices, and video content anytime you’d like. Talk to your servicing NAPA store to find out more.

      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Darrin Barney, Barney Brother's Off Road and Repair, Grand Junction CO. Darrin’s automotive journey began as a child working with his father on repairing and maintaining cars at the family garage. But the big turning point came when he turned 14 and his parents got him his first jeep. It was then that he realized that to keep it running he had to maintain it and take care of it. In 2003, he started his own auto repair and 4X4 business with the core business philosophy of treating every customer like a personal friend and creating the best customer experience possible. Darrin’s shop has grown to one of the biggest independently owned auto repair facilities in the state of Colorado. Darrin also has a passion for continuing education. In 2017 he was one of the first classes to graduate with his AMAM (Accredited Master Automotive Management) from the AMI. He is a current Board Member for ASA Colorado and recently became responsible for bringing the customer service piece of automotive training to his hometown in Grand Junction, Colorado. He is active in the aftermarket accessory industry and is a member of the LTAA (Light Truck Accessory Alliance), APPEX and SEMA. Darrin is a Certified High Performance Coach and enjoys helping others find success and happiness in their lives. 
      Key Talking Points
      Superstars interview YOU- they don’t want a job, they want a career/opportunity. They should ask you: what is your 5-year plan? 10? Succession plan?  Your A tech is probably working somewhere else. They will leave for a better opportunity, it’s not all about money.  People leave people not companies Getting close to your employees- don’t be a sniper manager, be involved and interact.  “50, 25, 25”- 50% the owner interviews employee, 25% the employee will review company, 25% the employee will interview the owner Most shop owners are technicians that think they could do better- but they are still a technician at heart. Growing from a technician to a business owner is crucial and often missed.  Do you know where your company is going? Dream and rewrite your mission statement.  Guiding principals- all the pieces that get the mission statement done. Get your team involved. Compensation plans- competitive wages, opportunistic income (above the base pay), take-home benefits (health insurance, retirement), continuing training Employee retention- live your mission statement, 10-minute team huddles to create unity and teamwork, never start your day on a sour note (no complaining) Connect with the show:
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partner:
      NAPA AutoCare’s PROimage program makes it easy for you to make the most of the NAPA brand. A PROimage upgrade lets you maintain your shop’s identity as a reliable, locally-owned business while letting your customers and potential customers know you’re partnering with NAPA, the most recognized and trusted name in the automotive aftermarket. AutoCare Centers that have completed a PROimage exterior upgrade enjoy an average 23 percent sales increase during the first year. You can also choose to go PROimage on the interior and transform your customer waiting area from merely utilitarian to warm and welcoming. You can even get a free look by visiting www.NAPAAutoCare.com and clicking on the NAPA PROimage link under the NAPA PROimage tab. Of course, the AutoCare site is also the place to go to find out about all the advantages being part of the NAPA family has to offer.

      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Rachel Spencer (Shop Owner), Spencer's Auto Repair, Krum Texas
      Roddy Blaylock (Shop Foreman) Barton Automotive, Wadesville, IN
      Clint White has been passionately immersed in the Automotive Industry for over 25 years. He is a Service Advisor Coach & Shop Consultant with CWI and currently holds multiple ASE certifications. He began his career as a Technician at a local two-bay shop in 1995 and over the course of the next two and a half decades honed his sales, technical, and management skills while living in Washington & S.E. Idaho. During his journey, he has never stopped learning and has been blessed to work for and with those who value education, training, and coaching. In everything he does, Clint is focused on people and excellence! Whether it be coaching & training Service Advisors to sell with passion & integrity or working directly with Shop Owners to improve team accountability and streamline process implementation, Clint’s passion is to elevate the Automotive Industry across the nation to ensure every customer consistently receives the highest level of service.
      Contact Clint White HERE
      Clint's Previous episodes HERE
      Key Talking Points
      Reality check-  The world around us has drastically changed yet many in our industry continue to operate as though it hasn’t. Replacement vehicles are significantly overpriced and inventory is severely limited. RESULT:  Customers MUST repair what they own and they know it! Technicians are in short supply and many shops are understaffed. RESULT: Same-day service is harder (or impossible) to deliver on, yet we keep trying? Parts are harder to find and slower to be delivered leaving Vendors stretched thin. RESULT:  Repairs take longer, especially when we choose to wait for the best quality parts. Sell correctly- have properly trained service advisors. Sell with confidence that it will be pushed back, don’t make it sound negative. Make it a positive experience. Build cushion when scheduling out. Continue to provide exceptional customer service. It’s time to prepare for the future- things won’t “go back” to the way it was and it shouldn’t Scheduling is like chess, plan your moves, close the expectation gap with customers, staff, and vendors. under-promise/over-deliver The importance of communication between technicians and service writers-updates- everyone needs to be on the same page SOP’s- Develop habits and have structure Proper mindset when repairing vehicles- reduced/eliminated comebacks improves moral and elevates self-worth The Dualistic Shop:  In order to schedule workflow effectively, we must view our shops as if they are actually “two in one”; operating independently but in perfect harmony while under one roof. Diagnostic Facility- all testing, inspecting, DVI’s and LOF’s occur FIRST. Bay management is maximized as cars rotate in and out once testing/inspecting is complete. Repair/Production Facility- Scheduled & Pre-Sold repairs are performed after all testing & DVI’s are completed for the day. Time Block Scheduling Example- Each Technician’s productivity potential and efficiency percentages must be known. Schedule each Technician at 87.5% of what they are capable of producing daily. Tech capable of 8 hours of production in an 8-hour day is 100% productive. 8 hours X .875 = 7 hours. Leaves 1 hour a day open for walk-in’s, emergencies, catch up from yesterday Connect with the show:
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partners:

      This episode is brought to you by Shop-Ware Shop Management. It’s time to run your business at its fullest potential with the industry’s leading technology. Shop-Ware Shop Management will increase your efficiency with lightning-fast workflows, help your staff capture more sales every day, and create very happy customers who promote your business. Shops running Shop-Ware have More Time and generate More Profit—join them! Schedule a free live demonstration and find out how 30 minutes can transform your shop at getshopware.com

      Are you seeing auto shops in your area get hundreds of 5-star Google reviews and are you feeling left behind because your shop only has a few?
      Hey look, Broadly is your answer to getting more online reviews. With more reviews, your business will rank higher in search results — and that means more customers coming into your shop every day. Broadly helps you automatically request reviews so that your customers can promote your business with just one click. When you immediately ask for a review after service, when the experience is still fresh in their mind, you’re more likely to get a 5-star positive review. Plus, asking for feedback makes your customer feel valued and more connected to your business. Isn’t that what you want a connected customer? See how Broadly can help grow your auto shop.  Visit www.getbroadly.com/chat to learn more.
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      “Your labor rate is too high. If you can’t negotiate your labor rate, I will have the car towed from your shop to another shop in your area that will do the work at the labor rate we want to pay.”
      Those were the words spoken to my service advisor a few weeks ago from a claims agent at an extended warranty company. The name of the company doesn’t matter. What does matter is what would you do when faced with this situation.
      Here’s another scenario you’re probably familiar with: After diagnosing a failed steering rack, the customer informed us that she had an aftermarket warranty policy. She asked me if I could find out if the steering rack is covered. I said, “Sure, I will be happy to help. But, just to let you know, most of the extended warranty companies I deal with have their own labor and parts pricing policies, which may not be aligned with our pricing. So, whatever they don’t pay, you will be responsible for. Are you OK with this?” My customer said, “Absolutely. I understand. I appreciate anything you can do for me.”
      I thought the hard part was over. What came next was bizarre. The insurance adjuster I spoke to authorized the repair, told me the labor dollars they will pay and then said, “OK, it looks like I have a used rack in a salvage yard in South Carolina. I can have that rack to you in two days.” I had to pinch myself to make sure I wasn’t in a weird dream. Used steering rack? Salvage yard? Is this guy for real?
      I quickly shot back and said, “Let me ask you a few questions. First, where does is state in the contract that your company will supply a junk yard part for your insured? And why in the world would I remove an old worn-out steering rack from my customer’s car and put back an old used rack from a junked vehicle? Is that really in the best interest of the customer?”
      The claims adjuster replied back, “Well, shops do it all the time.” I said, “I don’t think so, and I won’t do it either. Let me tell you how this is going to go. I am replacing the rack with a quality part, and I will make sure that my customer gets the best job possible. So, please give me the authorized amount and I will let the customer know what the balance is that your company will not pay.” He said, “You can’t do that.” I said, “Yes, I can. My customer is already briefed on the situation.”
      He reluctantly gave me the authorization number along with the dollar amount. I relayed the story to the customer. My customer then called the insurance company and gave them hell. They did end up authorizing additional money for the part I installed.
      Before we continue, I want to be fair and balanced. There are some extended warranty companies that try to offer their customers a peace-of-mind policy, and do pay a good portion of the repair. However, far too often, it’s a struggle to get an extended insurance company to agree to our labor and part prices.
      Here’s the deal. If you’re like me, you have spent countless hours understanding the numbers of your business. You’ve also spent a great deal of time and effort to put the right people in place, develop the right pay plans and have created the systems to run an efficient business. You know the balance between being competitive and profitable. When you consider all this, we need to carefully consider how negotiating our prices will affect our bottom line.
      I understand the reality too. Sometimes, you really need the work. You don’t want to lose the job. And settling for something is better than losing the job. I have been there. But the truth is that negotiating your prices, in the long run, will not only hurt you, but will also hurt our industry across the board.
      By the way, my service advisor never did negotiate our labor rate. He simply told the agent, “Our labor rate is non-negotiable. Do you have any other questions?” The agent eventually backed down and paid us the job at our labor rate.
      Be upfront with your customers. Clearly explain to them that their warranty policy may not cover the entire repair and come to an agreement with your customer before you call the warranty company. Lastly, make sure you know what it takes to earn a profit. Profit is needed to pay your expenses, put a little money aside for the future, pay your employees a decent wage and also pay yourself the salary you deserve. When you really analyze the bottom line and what’s really left over, do you really want to negotiate your prices?
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on May 1st, 2019


      View full article
    • By Joe Marconi
      “Your labor rate is too high. If you can’t negotiate your labor rate, I will have the car towed from your shop to another shop in your area that will do the work at the labor rate we want to pay.”
      Those were the words spoken to my service advisor a few weeks ago from a claims agent at an extended warranty company. The name of the company doesn’t matter. What does matter is what would you do when faced with this situation.
      Here’s another scenario you’re probably familiar with: After diagnosing a failed steering rack, the customer informed us that she had an aftermarket warranty policy. She asked me if I could find out if the steering rack is covered. I said, “Sure, I will be happy to help. But, just to let you know, most of the extended warranty companies I deal with have their own labor and parts pricing policies, which may not be aligned with our pricing. So, whatever they don’t pay, you will be responsible for. Are you OK with this?” My customer said, “Absolutely. I understand. I appreciate anything you can do for me.”
      I thought the hard part was over. What came next was bizarre. The insurance adjuster I spoke to authorized the repair, told me the labor dollars they will pay and then said, “OK, it looks like I have a used rack in a salvage yard in South Carolina. I can have that rack to you in two days.” I had to pinch myself to make sure I wasn’t in a weird dream. Used steering rack? Salvage yard? Is this guy for real?
      I quickly shot back and said, “Let me ask you a few questions. First, where does is state in the contract that your company will supply a junk yard part for your insured? And why in the world would I remove an old worn-out steering rack from my customer’s car and put back an old used rack from a junked vehicle? Is that really in the best interest of the customer?”
      The claims adjuster replied back, “Well, shops do it all the time.” I said, “I don’t think so, and I won’t do it either. Let me tell you how this is going to go. I am replacing the rack with a quality part, and I will make sure that my customer gets the best job possible. So, please give me the authorized amount and I will let the customer know what the balance is that your company will not pay.” He said, “You can’t do that.” I said, “Yes, I can. My customer is already briefed on the situation.”
      He reluctantly gave me the authorization number along with the dollar amount. I relayed the story to the customer. My customer then called the insurance company and gave them hell. They did end up authorizing additional money for the part I installed.
      Before we continue, I want to be fair and balanced. There are some extended warranty companies that try to offer their customers a peace-of-mind policy, and do pay a good portion of the repair. However, far too often, it’s a struggle to get an extended insurance company to agree to our labor and part prices.
      Here’s the deal. If you’re like me, you have spent countless hours understanding the numbers of your business. You’ve also spent a great deal of time and effort to put the right people in place, develop the right pay plans and have created the systems to run an efficient business. You know the balance between being competitive and profitable. When you consider all this, we need to carefully consider how negotiating our prices will affect our bottom line.
      I understand the reality too. Sometimes, you really need the work. You don’t want to lose the job. And settling for something is better than losing the job. I have been there. But the truth is that negotiating your prices, in the long run, will not only hurt you, but will also hurt our industry across the board.
      By the way, my service advisor never did negotiate our labor rate. He simply told the agent, “Our labor rate is non-negotiable. Do you have any other questions?” The agent eventually backed down and paid us the job at our labor rate.
      Be upfront with your customers. Clearly explain to them that their warranty policy may not cover the entire repair and come to an agreement with your customer before you call the warranty company. Lastly, make sure you know what it takes to earn a profit. Profit is needed to pay your expenses, put a little money aside for the future, pay your employees a decent wage and also pay yourself the salary you deserve. When you really analyze the bottom line and what’s really left over, do you really want to negotiate your prices?
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on May 1st, 2019

    • By Joe Marconi
      The issue with part quality and returns is on every shop owner's mind these days. It doesn't matter if you buy from NAPA, CARQUEST, Advance or O'Reillys. Poor quality parts, comebacks and getting the wrong part hurts our bottom line. I don't know how many of you track your losses with regard to comebacks and returns, I do. And I can tell you, it is doing more damage to your profit margin than you may think.
       
      I don't have the answer but I will bring up one fact. In the industry's effort to reduce prices, we have sent a lot of manufacturing business overseas. In order to maintain or reduce price, too often quality suffers. But who's is to blame? The part companies, the shop owner's who are seeking low prices, the consumer?
       
      The truth is, the time for pointing blame is gone. We need to change our mindset, not chose parts by price, but by quality. We need to start sending a message to our suppliers that we want quality not just price. We also need to insure that we don't have internal issues. Are our techs properly trained and do we have an adequate quality control system in place. Our reputation and the safety of the motoring public depends on it.
       
      Here is one other fact that you cannot deny: If you reduce comebacks, improve quality, sell quality parts at a reasonable margin, you WILL make more money, have happier customers and have a lot less stress.
       
      Here's a link to an interesting article on part quality from Aftermarket Business World
       
      http://www.searchautoparts.com/aftermarket-business/opinion-commentary-distribution/warranty-returns-plague-aftermarket-industry?cid=95879
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