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How much are you willing to pay to know what you know now when first starting out


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Knowing what you know now, how much would you have paid to know all this information when first starting out? I would have gladly shelled out $1000-$2000 and I was broke in the beginning! I would have saved a lot of money too by not making the mistakes I've made

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We all learn from our mistakes. I call it tuition. We all pay to learn. I haven't really made too many mistakes in the auto repair business, I'm pretty conservative and I opened up my shop after 15 years of working for other people learning from their mistakes.

 Ask me about the used car business and your head will spin. It has a much more expensive learning curve. About the same as gambling but not as much fun. 

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How much would it be worth or how much would I pay??

The knowledge would be worth somewhere around a cool million. How much would I pay? Obviously nothing because it took me 12 years to actually hire a coach of any kind. When I finally pulled the trigger, I paid $2000 a month on a 2 year contract. Spendy for sure, but I made a lot more than I paid. 

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4 minutes ago, AndersonAuto said:

How much would it be worth or how much would I pay??

The knowledge would be worth somewhere around a cool million. How much would I pay? Obviously nothing because it took me 12 years to actually hire a coach of any kind. When I finally pulled the trigger, I paid $2000 a month on a 2 year contract. Spendy for sure, but I made a lot more than I paid. 

What kind of coach? Life coach? Automotive coach where he's owned his own shop? $2k is a bit steep but depending on how involved he is in your business he could be really cheap 

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4 minutes ago, Jay Huh said:

What kind of coach? Life coach? Automotive coach where he's owned his own shop? $2k is a bit steep but depending on how involved he is in your business he could be really cheap 

Automotive coach. Good guys that own (still own) a very successful shop. They helped a lot with getting the sales and gross profit side in order. They helped me get a lot of things fixed, but I feel they neglected the expense side more than they should. They came on site, interviewed all the employees, went through all my processes etc. After that it was strictly over the phone and reporting numbers to them.

They were worth the money, and I'm still friends with them. Knowing what I know now, I probably could have got more bang for the buck, but it was the right fit for me at the time.

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16 hours ago, AndersonAuto said:

Automotive coach. Good guys that own (still own) a very successful shop. They helped a lot with getting the sales and gross profit side in order. They helped me get a lot of things fixed, but I feel they neglected the expense side more than they should. They came on site, interviewed all the employees, went through all my processes etc. After that it was strictly over the phone and reporting numbers to them.

They were worth the money, and I'm still friends with them. Knowing what I know now, I probably could have got more bang for the buck, but it was the right fit for me at the time.

Nice, I see that you are in Kansas. A little far but definitely sounds like it was worth the cost

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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