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Jay Huh

How much are you willing to pay to know what you know now when first starting out

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Knowing what you know now, how much would you have paid to know all this information when first starting out? I would have gladly shelled out $1000-$2000 and I was broke in the beginning! I would have saved a lot of money too by not making the mistakes I've made

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      View full article


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