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Nys inspection to test window tint


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Just over the wire today is all nys inspection stations will be required to test window tint as part of the inspection starting Jan 1. Anything blocking more than 30% light fails. More equipment to buy, more time, not to mention how does the average shop deal with removing window tint? I'm not opposed to keeping police safe from thugs with limo tint on the drivers window but I feel that's the police's job not the "safety/emissions" inspector.

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we have had to measure tint for a long time here in MD. Anything below 35% has to go.. removal is messy but not to bad.. just pull off the film and use a solution of dish soap and water saturate the window let it sit for a few minutes keeping it very wet . With a razor blade remove the glue comes off pretty easily this way.(I use a plastic blade for the rear window and am very gentle over the defroster). After all the glue is activated with a soap solution so removal is the same.. just be careful around the defrost lines in the rear glass. As far as the equipment I recall it not being to expensive two hand held monitors one on each side of the glass very simple takes half a second to do. I usually charge an hours labor to remove all the tint. Here in Md. all AS3 windows can have tint in fact they can be blacked out, you only find this on suv's .

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In NC we have to check aftermarket tinting also. It is the first item we check. If it is too dark, we inform the customer and let the customer deal with taking it off. Most of the time we send them to a local stereo shop that does a good job tinting for removal.

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Been there, done that. Be prepared for angry customers and learn how to handle them. We do not offer removing the window tinting... in the past we have had customers accuse use of "scratching" the glass, leaving the adhesive behind, etc... Not worth the labor we charged.

 

Follow the law regardless of the outcome of loosing a customer.

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We actually install and remove window film. We use a chemical that helps dissolve the adhesive left behind after removal of window film. You should be aware though that some film does not come off in one sheet and will crumble/break as you are removing it. This extends the time to remove the film by HOURS. We let customers know when this happens as you can tell almost immediately and charge appropriately.....

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Yeah, saw this when they passed the law back in June, took Cuomo this long to sign it. We only need to check the front two windows and the windshield, which means we need a two piece unit. Just started shopping for them. Looks like there are only a few available.

 

For you guys that have had to do this for a while, any suggestions on what measurement tool to buy, or maybe better, which one to avoid? So far the state hasn't issued any equipment guidelines, just the spec (at least 70% light transmittance), which has been the regulation for ages, just not enforced by Inspection stations. The vast majority of cars won't need to be checked as you can visually see they don't have tint, so I don't see the tool being used very often. you just need it when you need it.

 

Since I already loose about $10 for each inspection we do how many do we need to do to make up for the $200 tool I need to buy :rolleyes:

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Unbelievable we are suppose to perform this law with no increase in fees but that is Albany. Buy a cheap tester so you can show it to the inspector & carry on.

Charge for removal to the few cars we see with dark tint & recoup the cost.

Dave

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The unit that we purchased to comply with the NY state mandate is the Laser Labs Tint Meter, 2-Piece - Inspector II. Below is the link for purchase. I hope this helps out.

 

http://www.laser-labs.com/product/tint-meter-inspector-2/

 

yeah we ended up getting the same one a week or so ago, works fine, haven't gotten a car in yet that we've had to use it on though.

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Unbelievably the first inspection of this year the car had dark tint that would not pass the meter test.

I called the customer & she said the police had told her the same. I charged $150.00 to remove all side window tint.

We needed to razor blade the sticky glue off, it took about 2 hours total. Not a bad job but I will charge more next time.

Dave

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