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insomniac

Stocking Tires?

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Was wondering if it is worth to stock tires? Seems like with all the sizes would be a tremendous outlay of money but sometimes the big box stores like Pep Boys, Mavis, STS etc.. are hard to compete with because they stock the tires and sometimes it could take me hours to get the tires from the supplier.

 

Thoughts?

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Edited by tyrguy

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Edited by tyrguy

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