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Hands On

It was not like that when I brought it in.

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We recently took in a 2005 golf with a hole in the oil pan. It was a big hole. I made a note on the estimate that we did not know if there was engine damage because the hole was too big to fill with oil and run. When the oil pan was down we saw what looked like a pinch of bearing material squeazed out around the #1 main. We took a picture of this bearing damage then installed the pan. Added oil and car started. No power, Turbo seized. Now customer is accusing us of running the car with no oil and ruining his turbo. How would you guys handle this situation. I really don't feel like having a horrible google review calling us idiots.

 

 

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