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Joe Marconi

Shop Owners! October is here; end of year tips for a stronger future

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October starts the year’s fourth and final quarter. A time where shops begin to reflect back on the year and look toward the next year. For many of us, it’s been a wild roller coaster ride, for others not so bad. That’s business, and we all know that there will always be good days and bad days.

 

The key thing to remember as leaders of your business, is to always be looking to the future. Learn from the past, but don’t dwell on it. Become more proactive. Try different things and don’t be afraid to fail. Through failure are valuable lessons.

 

Set your sights high and remember to begin planning now for 2016. Don’t wait until the end of the year, or even worse the start of 2016. The earlier you begin to dissect and analyze the current year, the better position you will be to improve your chances of a more successful future.

 

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