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Joe Marconi

You have goals…but what about your employee’s goals?

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As a shop owner, you have both business goals and personal goals. Goals are critical to your success. Setting goals is like planning out a trip. Each step is carefully outlined and mapped out. You know where you want to ultimately end up, and you know how you will get there. But what about your employees? Don’t they have goals?

 

Employees may not have sat down and wrote out a detailed plan, but let me assure you, they have goals too. Employees care about their future, their kid’s future and also have wants and desires.

 

My advice is to find out what those goals are, and here’s why. When employees know that you care about their well-being as a person, they will begin to align their goals with your goals. They see the bigger picture; that in order to achieve what they want out of life, they must help you achieve what you want also.

 

But the key here is to make sure you as the shop owner make the first move. Sit down with employees, ask them about their future desires and dreams. Then begin to build your business around not just what you want, but what everyone wants. This also means that you must become profitable enough to be able to continue to compensate your employees at a level that they feel secure in their position.

 

But, it’s never all about the numbers and the dollars. As shop owner, you are also a mentor. And the most important employee-related job you have is understanding your employees and helping them achieve their wants and desires.

 

Motivational Speaker Zig Ziglar once said, “You can get anything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want”

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