Quantcast
Jump to content


Newbie in Southern California


Recommended Posts

Hello everyone out there in ASO land. You will all become use to seeing my screen name all over this forum because I have a lot of questions lol. A little about why Im here. My father has been doing bodywork for 40+ years and about 12 years ago, he decided that he wanted to open up shop for himself. Business was up and down since and actually closed the shop about 3 years into it because it wasnt making enough to keep the doors open. It started because my father enjoyed what he did, and was very good at it... but didnt know how to manage a business. He was great at his trade, but didnt know what came along with actually running the business side of it. He was the only tech there and my brothers and myself lent a hand but could only do so much. He felt defeated at the time but wanted to try it again when the time was right. They opened up again in 2008 and moved into a bigger location in 2010 where they are at right now. Now my brothers are older and picked up the knowledge from my dad and have done well for themselves as far as getting customers. Problem is, there is no management in play. They know how to do the work and enjoy it, but the business aspect of it is wearing them thin since my younger brother has been stand in office manager/tech/painter. I see the potential in the business and would love to see it flourish so we can continue to build what my father had envisioned. I have a lot of goals and doing my research so that I may see them through. I came across a site that really put things in prospective as far as starting a business. It explained that many times businesses fail because someone gets the itch to open up for themselves because they enjoy something and want to do it for themselves... but dont think about the business aspect of it.. only the trade part. They called the "entrepreneurial seizure" and its explained as:

 

An entrepreneurial seizure is the moment the entrepreneur decides it would be a great idea to start his or her own business. It's when one believes that knowing how to do the work of a business is all one needs to understand in order to start and grow a business. So the accountant starts an accounting practice; the mechanic starts an auto repair business; the cook opens up a restaurant. They go to work, accounting, fixing cars, or cooking meals, none of which is the true work of the entrepreneur. In doing so, the person who starts his or her own business is lost in the teeming confusion created by demands he or she never anticipated...the demands of organization, the demands of cash flow, the demands of people -- employees, customers, suppliers, banks, family -- and so forth and so on. They are simply not prepared for the demands that are going to be made on them. The longer they're in business, the worse it gets. There is no vision; there is only being a slave to work and staying alive. The seizure is long gone, the entrepreneurial vision a vague memory.

 

And I believe this is what happens a lot. Which is why I know that getting feedback from experienced shop owners like yourselves, can only help with what im trying to do to get this business going. I am looking for workflow ideas for organization, management/estimating systems, I have Quickbooks and I'm working on getting the shop cleaned up and looking like a professional location instead of a pile of bondo dust lol (although I love the smell of bondo lol). I do have questions but feel that my "intro" has been super long and I mightve lost a few readers along the way lol. For those that have stuck around, thank you =) I look forward to feedback and to building "friendships" with my fellow ASO'ers . Thanks again for your time.

 

 

*** for those wondering the site that excerpt was from, its called www.e-myth.com ... highly recommend it for the newbies out there looking to start a business from their hobby just for insight ***

 

 

 

*** Gina

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good luck and you are on the path. Educating yourself is the first step to freedom.

Agreed! I believe its the only way to go. Trust me, I am super excited to start this venture, but I've learned from others mistakes and am doing what I can to be prepared for the task ahead instead of just jumping in and winging it lol Luck can only take you so far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome! These guys are really nice and very helpful.

 

Went to the website you posted, now looking for a copy of the book.

 

Yes!! It puts a lot into prospective! I'm easily distracted and impatient at times, so reading that book wouldve kept my attention because of the content but my ADD wouldve kicked in eventually lol So I opted for the audio that is FREE on youtube!! its about 8 hours but great to listen to the narrator emphasis on things. Here is the link for those that are just like me lol https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrqwYB2WUos

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By jadetrost
      Hello guys I’m Jade Trost 56 years. New  on this forum 
    • By nptrb

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Tanner Brandt covers critical topics such as the importance of curiosity, the 'what, why, and how' of learning, and the necessity of continuous education in the automotive industry. Tanner offers insights into diagnosing vehicles, solving complex problems, and the value of understanding the reasons behind every step in the repair process. This engaging discussion serves as a vital resource for technicians, shop owners, and trainers committed to staying ahead in the industry. Tanner Brandt, Autodiag Clinic. Tanner’s previous episodes HERE. Show Notes
      Breaks for Breasts (00:01:10) Carm Capriotti talks about the initiative "Breaks for Breasts" and its fundraising for breast cancer vaccine research at the Cleveland Clinic. https://www.brakesforbreasts.com/ The Methodology of Learning and Education (00:04:18) Tanner Brandt discusses the what, why, and how of learning and education, emphasizing the importance of making a plan and understanding the purpose of learning. The Importance of Understanding "Why" (00:06:20) Tanner Brandt emphasizes the importance of understanding the "why" in the learning process, using examples from diagnosing vehicles and performing tasks deliberately. Challenges in Encouraging Curiosity (00:11:48) Tanner Brandt discusses challenges in nurturing curiosity, sharing personal experiences from education and the automotive industry. Nurturing Curiosity (00:17:08) The benefits of curiosity in becoming a better technology specialist and diagnostician are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of nurturing curiosity from a young age. Curiosity and Learning (00:18:08) Discussion about the importance of curiosity in learning, and the need for mentors and teachers to foster curiosity in automotive repair. Surgeon and Diagnostic Skills (00:19:02) Comparison of diagnostic skills in automotive repair to a surgeon's need for broad knowledge, curiosity, and preparation. NAPA Auto Care Apprentice Program (00:20:28) Details about the NAPA Auto Care apprentice program, its curriculum, and the benefits for shops and apprentices. Diagnostic Case Study (00:23:15) Discussion about the importance of preparation and research for diagnostic work, with examples from real-life scenarios. Understanding Vehicle Systems (00:24:21) Insight into the importance of understanding vehicle systems and the need to research and understand the logic behind their functions. Critical Thinking and Diagnostic Planning (00:27:05) Importance of critical thinking, systematic planning, and complete system scans for effective diagnostics. Learning and Expert Help (00:30:39) Encouragement to seek understanding of "why" in learning and to find expert help from experienced professionals. Accountability and Testing (00:35:21) Discussion on the importance of post-tests for knowledge retention, caution about tests being written before curriculum, and the need for effective testing methods. Certifying Trainers (00:37:48) Discussion on the need for certifying trainers and the challenges in ensuring their expertise. Continued Education (00:38:59) Exploration of the importance of continued education for trainers and the lack of oversight in the current system. Types of Classes (00:39:46) Exploring the different types of classes needed for effective training, including teaching and communication skills. Training Hours (00:42:05) Debate on the number of training hours required to stay updated with automotive technology and the significance of continuous learning. Confession and Expertise (00:45:37) Discussion on the misconception of expertise after attending short classes and the need for continuous learning. Curiosity of Young Technicians (00:49:02) Assessment of the curiosity and commitment of young technicians entering the automotive industry. Challenges in Training Turnout (00:53:11) Challenges in ensuring attendance and participation in training sessions, and the commitment required from shop owners. Responsibility in Training Commitment (00:54:07) Emphasis on the responsibility of shop owners to actively support and participate in the training commitment for the improvement of the entire shop. The importance of scheduling training (00:54:27) Discussion on the challenges of scheduling training in the automotive industry and the importance of prioritizing it. Closing the shop for training (00:54:52) Debate about the necessity of closing the shop for training and the analogy of scheduling around a doctor's conference. Making time for training and life (00:55:29) The significance of scheduling time for training and personal life, and using calendar systems to block off training days.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Learn more about NAPA Auto Care and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting https://www.napaonline.com/en/auto-care Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • Water Proof And Self Adhesive
    • By Changing The Industry
      Has Certification Testing Been Dumbed Down? #podcast #automotivebusiness #carrepair


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...