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I remember watching my son’s little league game, some years ago. A ball was hit into the outfield. The 10 year old centerfielder catches the ball on two bounces and attempts to throw the runner out that was heading home from third base. In the stands a father is screaming at the kid, “Second base! Second Base!”

 

Well, the runner was safe, the kid who hit the ball ended up on second base. The father unloaded a series of rants at the young ball player. The coach, being a smart man, walked over to the father and said, “Sir, the kid made a mistake, he’s young. He thought he was doing the right thing. He doesn’t yet know to throw it to second base to stop the runner from advancing.”

 

Essentially, when people are young and in training, they will make mistakes. And, they really cannot be responsible for things that they do not know. Making a mistake does not always mean someone is wrong.

 

Be patient with young employees. They will make mistakes. The way to minimize the mistakes is training. Lots of training. The company has the obligation to provide continuous training for all employees, especially entry level.

 

Your thoughts?

 

 

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