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Joe Marconi

Local Parts Store, Shows Continued Loyalty to Shops

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Everyone shop owner I speak with today is concerned about the quality of the parts they purchase. And while many of us enjoy low prices on some part lines, we do not enjoy the comebacks and poor quality of many of the parts we purchase. The long term effect is anyone's guess, but it cannot be good. The loss of revenue and the potential loss of consumer confidence is perhaps the biggest worry.

 

With another Cardone Steering Rack failure, I am forced to once again turn to the dealer for many of the aftermarket parts that I have lost confidence in

 

I can tell you that my local CARQUEST/Advance has not turned its back on me or other shops in the area. And while they are going thru their own challenges with the Advance acquisition deal, they have been steadfast in their continued loyalty to their customers, the independent repair shops in the Putnam/Westchester New York area.

 

They are listening and working with us, attempting to contact Cardone about their failure rate, and I also appreciate their honesty. It gives my renewed hope that we are on the right track. I just hope Cardone and the rest of the aftermarket is listening.

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