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Joe Marconi

Yes, you can get it cheaper on the internet…

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Yes, you can get it cheaper on the internet…

 

I am not alone with this one. We see more and more people telling us that they can get the part cheaper on the internet, right? I overheard my manager speaking to a customer about a catalytic converter job. After Bill gave him the price of the job, the customer said, “I see those catalytic converters on the internet for half the amount you are selling to me. I cringed when the customer said this.

 

But my manager was ready. He simply said, “Yes you can get it cheaper on line, do you have any other questions?”

 

He remained silent and waited for the customer to continue, the customer said, “Well I guess it’s like anything else, you can always get things cheaper on line, you might as well get it done”

 

I am not sure this strategy will work every time, but it was fun to see it work this time.

 

 

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