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Joe Marconi

All that hard work and the customer doesn’t notice

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Last Wednesday I brought my wife’s car in for a few repairs: a T belt, a check engine light repair, spark plugs and a few other services. The car also needed front struts and mounts. The car would hit really hard over any road imperfection. The check engine light was related to a fuel problem, and I noticed a lack of power at times.

 

As I drove the car home after all the repairs were done, I could notice a big difference in the way the car ran and handled on the road. Yesterday my wife took the car out, went to lunch with my daughter and then out to the mall and I few other errands. She had the car the entire day. When she returned home, I asked her, “So, do you notice a difference with the way your car runs and handles on the road?” With a straight face she says, “Not really”.

 

Not really? I could not believe my ears. How could something so obvious to me, go unnoticed by someone who drives the car every day!

 

This got me thinking about how our customers. We work so hard and at times perform technological magic. How many of our customers notice a difference when they get their car back? I would bet many do not.

 

It all goes back to what the customer CAN and WILL notice. And that’s how they are treated, the look of you shop, your customer bathroom, your techs, how clean the waiting area is, and the appearance of the car when they get it back. Unfortunately, the hard work under the hood or under the car simply goes unnoticed.

 

 

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    • By Joe Marconi
      I’ll never forget the day when Mrs. Obrien brought her car back for me to look at.  She was furious. I stayed late the night before, well into the night, to finish her car so she could have it for work the next day.  I even did a few little things on the house because I felt she may be a little inconvenienced picking the car up so late.
      Why did she bring the car back?  A comeback?  Well, not in the conventional way. It was the greasy smudge on her seat that she was angry about.  
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      The holidays are a great time of the year to strengthen your relationship with employees and customers. Spend time with customers and employees discussing holiday plans and family. Show everyone that you value people first, profit second. Make sure you are genuine and show sincere interest in others. In the spirit of Christmas, the more you give the more you will receive. And of course, never forget your own family.
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