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Joe Marconi

All that hard work and the customer doesn’t notice

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Last Wednesday I brought my wife’s car in for a few repairs: a T belt, a check engine light repair, spark plugs and a few other services. The car also needed front struts and mounts. The car would hit really hard over any road imperfection. The check engine light was related to a fuel problem, and I noticed a lack of power at times.

 

As I drove the car home after all the repairs were done, I could notice a big difference in the way the car ran and handled on the road. Yesterday my wife took the car out, went to lunch with my daughter and then out to the mall and I few other errands. She had the car the entire day. When she returned home, I asked her, “So, do you notice a difference with the way your car runs and handles on the road?” With a straight face she says, “Not really”.

 

Not really? I could not believe my ears. How could something so obvious to me, go unnoticed by someone who drives the car every day!

 

This got me thinking about how our customers. We work so hard and at times perform technological magic. How many of our customers notice a difference when they get their car back? I would bet many do not.

 

It all goes back to what the customer CAN and WILL notice. And that’s how they are treated, the look of you shop, your customer bathroom, your techs, how clean the waiting area is, and the appearance of the car when they get it back. Unfortunately, the hard work under the hood or under the car simply goes unnoticed.

 

 

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