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mccannable

Equipment required for start up?

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I am probably a bit different than most folks here. I am not a professional mechanic and do not intend to be. I have been planning opening my garage heavily for about a year. Few years ago went back to school to take as many business and accounting classes and have learned alot. I am currently working with some successful mentors which have been a great help but wanted to ask this community(which seems very respectable) that I have been following for some time.

 

What is the must have equipment for general repair shop start up? We plan on focusing on european makes because of lack of local support but I know a lot of the major (non diagnostic) equipment is universal. A list of the core required equipment that “you” see necessary would be appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance.

Edited by mccannable

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