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Big_K

Moving A Shop...3 Blocks Away, Advice Is Appreciated

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So I will give a very quick background. We have been in business for roughly 25 years. Over the past several years business has been slowing down, and I am trying to figure out why.

 

The current location we are in, is on a fairly busy street in the area, next to a gas station. It is all mostly open air, with tarps over the lifts, concrete needs to be re-done. Office way in the back, with two seats next to the smog machine as a quasi-"waiting room/area."

 

We specialize in Volvo, BMW, Audi, Mercedes but will also work on Japanese imports.

 

I believe we are an eye sore as for as pure aesthetics and I think some customers are not returning or I see them pull in, and pull back out after taking a look around.

 

 

Do I invest to make this place prettier? (We tried to build an 8 bay building on this location 10 years ago, but ran into so many permitting problems that we stopped trying.)

 

 

We own a warehouse 3 blocks away, also a fairly busy street, but not as busy. Quick Freeway access. The building is basically the same size of the lot, except only 6 parking spots in front, and one door for cars.

 

My gut instinct is to move into this place, epoxy flooring, very nice and large customer area and also 3 offices in the front.

 

The only complaints about this place are parking and that moving cars would be a little tighter.

 

We own both properties and I am wondering do I move to the other location, try to run both locations, split services between both locations (Engine Overhaul and Suspension @ one, and quick services at the other) add tire sales also? I considered asking the neighbor with an empty lot for a few spots if I could rent them.

 

 

 

There are a lot of thoughts and "possibilities" in this post so I understand it might be hard to read. Anyone been in a situation like this, can give some advice, or point me in the right direction? We are a family business and I think we are reaching the limit of our knowledge and expertise and perhaps no one will really know? Regardless I am looking at as many channels of information to make the best informed decision. (which is why I am here)

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