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Don’t Be A “Me Too” Brand

 

When someone says “Volvo”, we think safety. When we say “Starbucks”, we think coffee. These companies have done an amazing job at marketing. They own a concept or position in the mind of the consumer.

 

It is nearly impossible for two companies to the same concept or position. Market leaders are often the first to bring to the market a concept or position. Being first is important. Other car companies have tried, including Mercedes, to brand safety in their marketing campaigns, yet only Volvo has succeeded in anchoring the concept of safety in the prospect’s mind.

 

For shop owners, we need to study and understand our market, but be careful not to copy our competition, especially if the competition owns a concept or position in our market area. Copying what the competition does will result in you becoming what’s known as a “me too” brand, a copycat. And copycats are rarely considered credible.

 

Find your niche, find what makes you different, find out what you do that others do not do. Only then will you stand out from the pack and become a market leader in your area of differentiation.

 

I know we all service and repairs cars. That’s how we generate sales, but it’s not what defines us.

 

Find what makes you different and you will build your pathway to success.

 

 

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