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Joe Marconi

Breaking My Own Rule

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If I can avoid it, I will not give price over the phone for something I have no knowledge of and not checked out. If we tell a regular customer who is in for service that the timing belt needs to be replaced and she calls back to get a price, that’s a different story and those jobs are money in the bank. Why? They are already our customer and there is that trust/relationship factor. But to blindly give someone a price on something that we have not inspected, based on what they think they need, over the phone, just does not sit well with me.

 

The other day, an acquaintance through the Local Chamber of Commerce, called me for a price on a brake job for his Land Rover. Why someone who owns a Land Rover needs a price is another story. So, after a few questions and explaining to him the reasons why I should inspect the car prior to giving a price, he pleaded with me and I caved in and gave him an estimate. A few days later I called him and left a message and he has not returned my call. This happened once before with this guy when he needed a price on tires. He never came in for the tires either.

 

I do plan on speaking to him at the next chamber meeting. He owns a local pharmacy and I am going to politely ask him how he would feel if the next time I shop in his store I asked the price of his deodorant, toothpaste, cough drops, medications and other items BEFORE I purchase them.

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