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How Not to Treat a Customer


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The other day a customer walked into our service area with her 96 year old grandmother. The grandmother, also a customer but has stop driving due to her age and illness, is receiving treatments for cancer at a doctor’s office around the corner from my shop. The granddaughter handed me a box of cookies, wished me Merry Christmas, and asked for a favor. She said, “My grandmother was too early for her appointment at the doctor’s office and they told her that they would be closing the office from 2 to 3pm”. Meaning they would have to leave and come back. She asked me if they could wait in my service area for the hour. I told them, “absolutely, and help yourself to coffee and just relax for the hour”. I could see that the grandmother was obviously upset over the policy at her doctor’s office.

 

Maybe it’s me, but is that the way we should treat people? Especially a 96 year old grandmother? I would like to know who told the grandmother, a patient receiving cancer treatments, to please leave and come back in an hour. When someone arrives early at my shop before we open, we unlock the door and welcome them in. I think this doctor’s office needs to review its policy and also needs a lesson in customer service.

 

What do you think?

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we close for an hour at lunch also. Our hours are m-f 8-5:30. I usually open the door at 7 and close it around 6. If someone is waiting throught lunch they can i rearely leave but close the office so I can clean up the shop alittle and do estimates etc during lunch while eating. If needed I would stay open and never woudl ask someone to leave. How can docots get away with that. they also get away with alot more mistake then us yet every human body works the same way and the orgins are in the same spots? lol. Techs are smarter then docotrs no doubt in my opinion.

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