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Spend Time With Family and Friends


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My tip this week is a recurring theme, and one that will be repeated often: During the holiday season, spend time with family and friends. Automotive shop owner are among the hardest working group of people on this planet. We all need a little down time to enjoy life and recharge our batteries. Work is important but we need to prioritize the things in life that are free and are most important.

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all ASO members and their families!

 

Joe Marconi

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    • By Joe Marconi
      It's hard to believe that it's almost a year since COVID-19 hit.  And for many businesses, and repair shops, it's been a challenge.  While many areas around the country have not seen a downturn, there are other areas that have been harshly impacted.
      Areas such as mine have seen a decline in miles driven per customer of up to 50% or more.  Just consider working from home, the drastic decline of going out to dine and other activities, a decrease in after-school activities, a decease in youth sports, buying online and every other action that has become the norm, and it adds up to a negative impact for so many shops.
      NOW, you know ME.  I always put a positive spin on everything.  At this too shall pass. COVID-19 will be behind us and we need to prepare for great times ahead.  
      I urge everyone to focus on people: Your family, your employees, your customers, and the community.
      With regard to your customers, they will remember you and their experience long after the water pump or mass air filter you replaced in their car.  
      If you are having a decline in sales, here a few tips:  Establish your new goals, look at your expenses, reevaluate your breakeven, make sure your labor and part margins are in line.  BUT, never forget that your most important strategy is the culture of your business. 
      Lastly, cherish every minute with family.  This Crisis has brought Clarity. And let's never forget the things that money cannot buy. 
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      The Summer is in full swing, a time when many people take vacations and also spend time engaging in their favorite hobbies and activities. 
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    • By Joe Marconi
      I thought this article from Ratchet and Wrench was an interesting perspective. Let me know what you think?  Joe Marconi 
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      May 27, 2022   Nolan O'Hara   No Comments With increasing costs and rising inflation, many shop owners realize it may be time to raise their labor rates. But it’s always a battle. 
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      It’s difficult to run a shop, and it’s certainly not easy to find and keep professional technicians. It’s vital to know your numbers. Massoll bases his labor rates on his effective labor rate, analyzing his wages and costs. 
      Massoll says understanding your effective labor rate is critical and provides a better insight into your true costs, including the costs of obtaining and keeping your skilled labor. 
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      With prices going up everywhere, Massoll’s biggest piece of advice for other shop owners is to charge appropriately for your work. 
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