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Joe Marconi

Clinton vs. Herman Cain

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I am sick of the double standard in this country. Clinton admitted he lied to the American public and did have affairs while he was president. BUT, the media and liberals stood behind him saying, “You have to separate what he did from his presidency”. The liberals made excuses for him, forgave him gave him the customary “liberal double-standard pass”

 

Now we have Herman Caine, who has been accused, not found guilty, but accused, and the media is having a field day with this. Why? Because he is a conservative republican. That’s why. Whatever happened to innocent until proven guilty? Why is Herman Caine being judged by the media based solely by accusations!

 

And, even if Herman Caine is guilty, Why was it OK for Clinton and NOT ok for a Republican???

 

There clearly is an agenda in this country where the left can do no wrong and the right needs to walk a fine line and tip toe through a political mine field.

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