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Joe Marconi

Honda/Acura: Transmission Service or not?

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I hear many conflicting points of view about Honda/Acura transmission services. The Honda/Acura dealers in my area only do a drain and refill. They claim that servicing the transmission with a total fluid exchange machine (notice I did not say flush) that removes all the old fluid and refills with new is not advisable. Also, Honda claims that if you should only use Honda fluid.

 

We have all BG machines and perform transmission services on just about all makes and models. We have been doing this for more than 10 years. We also use BG synthetic fluid. I believe that I am giving my customers a great value by performing preventive maintenance and we back it up with the BG Lifetime program if the vehicle has under 75,000 miles.

 

I do know one things, Honda/Acura has a lot of transmission issues that cannot be blamed on “TOO MUCH” servicing.

 

I would like others to tell me their thoughts on Honda transmissions and other fluid services.

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