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Besides my relationship to God the other really important thing in my life is my wife, children, and grandchildren. My wife and I will be married 37 years in July. Now I am not that old. We got married when I was 20. We have three children and seven grandchildren but we now have the news that number 8 and number 9 are on the way. My son and his wife have one on the way in October. He has three girls and wants a boy really bad. Then this week we learned that our youngest daughter is having her second. Our grandkids are a blast. We are excited and happy and consider ourselves blessed. Forgivge me for bragging but I married a very beautiful and talented woman and our kids are all talented musicians and singers and it looks like the grandkids will follow suit. When I say talented I mean that our youngest daughter has the looks, the moves, and the voice to make the top ten on American Idol but she won't do it but pursues Christian ministry. She is good enough that she has recorded work out CDs for Curves and has performed live at Curves business conventions in Atlanta, SanFrancisco and Chicago. Here is my youngest daughter and her husbands websiste: Criag Jones Ministries Worship

 

Forgive me for bragging guys but I am very proud of my family and I am really excited to have a new grand baby. My wife and I really value family and have always hoped to have ten grandkids. We are now getting close because 9 is on the way. Of course, the down side is Christmas, birthdays, and taking everybody out to eat is breaking me up. :D

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