Quantcast
Jump to content


Loaner Cars


Recommended Posts

Anyone out there have loaner cars? I am in NJ and insurance is high here. My agent sounds like nobody wants to insure loaners but I know of shops in other parts of the country that seem to do well with them. Any feedback on this subject would be appreciated. If you can refer me to insurance companies that would be good for this that would be good.

 

Gary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Loaner cars can be a huge benefit. The problems are insurance and having enough cars available. If you advertise loaner cars and your car counts are high, you may end up disappointing people when you don’t have a car to give them. This is the problem even dealerships have.

 

We made a deal with a local Enterprise for a good rate. (Approx. $30.00 per day) Enterprise will meet my customer at my shop and handle the entire transaction. For high-ticket jobs, I will give them the rental if it helps to get the job.

 

Are there any rental companies in your area? If so, meet with them a broker a deal.

 

Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Anyone out there have loaner cars? I am in NJ and insurance is high here. My agent sounds like nobody wants to insure loaners but I know of shops in other parts of the country that seem to do well with them. Any feedback on this subject would be appreciated. If you can refer me to insurance companies that would be good for this that would be good.

 

Gary

 

Most of the more successful shops that I know of use both loaners and rentals.

 

For insurance, we use:

 

http://www.hastingsmutual.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

I think equally important is to offer a shuttle service, if possible, to work, home or a nearby shopping mall.

 

I am having a tough time figuring this out in a 3 man operation (myself, two techs). Shuttling can easily take 15-30 minutes in our urban area. Pulling anyone away from the shop for this long would mean no profit on many repairs. I have considered hiring a retiree to handle this, but I cannot justify having him around all day for only a few runs. How do you guys handle shuttles, and who does the driving?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi
      From what I am hearing from my fellow shop owner friends, the shops in my area, Northeast (New York), auto repair shops are busy and steady. However, there is a feeling from many shop owners to be cautious about the future. 
      Things that give shop owners concern: Inflation, the cost of living affecting the consumer's ability to afford auto repairs, dissatisfaction with the current administration,  and possible recession. 
      Your thoughts? 
    • By Eric Roberts
      Firstly let me say that I an just a regular guy from the UK who is the owner of a seven bay service centre/garage. I am not a financial expert. The dreaded inflation is upon us again. For the guys as old as me then this is nothing new. Back in the 70,s we had 15% inflation, but we all got by and lived for better trading days. Here in the UK we have always looked up to the USA because of your business prowess. So what do you guys look out as your worst enemy!
      When prices are going up then I find that the gap opens between rich and the poor's disposable income. So this question will effect garage owners in different areas. My garage is in a poor area with many immigrant families who drive cars. So this means we have to be more flexible with pricing. Finding out if your customer can afford that service ! For this reason we devised a three tier service pricing structure. This has also the effect of not loosing your profit margins. 
      The lowest price should include an oil and filter change and a general vehicle check over. This way we find the customer will perhaps be able to afford a service and your profit margins wont drop. This is just one small idea that we carry out! What do you guys do in these times of high inflation ? 
    • By Joe Marconi
      Most communities have a variety of repair shops, dealerships, and franchise models.  Do you consider them the competition, or colleagues?
      Do you think it's worth it to get to know other auto businesses in your community?  To share and exchange business ideas and strategies?
       
       
       
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      Here is an excerpt from a report from Lang Marketing:  Read and enjoy! 
      Six Major Takeaways
      Lang Marketing expects that new car and light truck volume will remain in low gear from 2020 through 2023 compared to the previous four years (2016 through 2019).  Lower new vehicle annual volume will trigger five significant aftermarket changes that will boost the volume of aftermarket products from 2022 through 2030. By increasing used vehicle prices and shifting miles to older vehicles, lower new vehicle sales will boost aftermarket product volume through 2030. An increase in the average age of vehicles and more older vehicles on the road, both resulting from lower new vehicle sales, will provide a tailwind for aftermarket product growth. Although there will be fewer vehicles in the repair-age sweet-spot between 2026 and 2030, this will create a mileage shift to older vehicles and an increase in the upper age boundary of the repair-age sweet-spot, which will be positive for aftermarket product growth Lower new vehicle sales will slow the growth of Electric Vehicles on the road, increasing the use of ICE vehicles and pumping up their aftermarket product volume. Source: 
      Lang Marketing Resources, Automotive Aftermarket Consulting, Research and Analysis  
       
    • Advertise your services or products to passers-by attracting them towards your business
    • By carmcapriotto
      Another informative episode with NAPA’s VP of Emerging Technology, Susan Starnes. We talk about NAPA’s support for all their customers as they focus on providing tools, parts, and training to meet all the future technology needs so we can seize every opportunity to repair the newest high-tech vehicles.
      Susan Starnes, Vice President, Emerging Markets of Genuine Parts Company
      Key Talking Points
      General discussion about the penetration of EVs, ADAS, connectivity Her team works closely with training NexDrive program- equipt shops to service EV’s and hybrids, started in the Netherlands in 2020. Looking to roll out and test in the US soon. Having products, training and communication and support around the program.  
      Connect with the Podcast:
      Aftermarket Radio Network
       
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partner:
      Learn more about NAPA AutoCare and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting www.NAPAAutoCare.com
         
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Our Sponsors










×
×
  • Create New...