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Put 2020 Behind you, Build a strong shop for 2021


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Let's face it, all of us were affected by COVID-19. Some more than others.  One of the biggest issue is the feeling of uncertainty....what we call the unknown.  But, humans are no strangers to tough times.  Tough times brings clarity and opportunity.  It forces us to create new strategies in an effort to improve both our business and personal life. 

We cannot turn back the hands of time. 2020 will be behind us in a few days.  Work hard now to make 2021 a banner year.  There has never been a time so important as now. Learn from the events of 2020. Create your new goals. Work on your people skills. Work on the numbers of the business.

I am sure all of us learned many lessons this past year, and one of them was to be financially prepared for a crisis.  While COVID was different, the financially-stronger shops did do better. 

Lastly, have a positive mindset at all times. And set the right tone as the leader of your shop. Your positive attitude will create the right culture and a pathway to better times.  

What lessons have you learned and would like to share? 

 

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