Quantcast
Jump to content


    • You can post now and register later. Already registered? sign in now to post with your account.
    • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

        Only 75 emoji are allowed.

      ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

      ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

      ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


      Once you submit your question, a new topic will be created for you in our forums. Our moderators may move your topic to a more suitable forum category if one exists. Members will see your topic and be able to respond to your question.

    • This will not be shown to other users.

Recommended Posts

We all survive by and need healthy car counts. That's a given. But all too often I see auto repair shops with "steady" but not "growing" car counts, but with new customers coming in each week.

So, the question is, "If a shop has steady car counts and has new customers each week, then why are car counts not growing?"  

This is a topic that's complicated for a post but here are a few things to consider:

  1. Is your marketing attracting the right customer that matches your key profile customer? If not, the wrong customer may be a one-timer and that does not help your car count.  Or, if you are promoting too much discounting, you may be attracting the wrong customer, and that's not a long-term strategy either. 
  2. Are you making every effort to WOW all new customers and create an amazing experience that gives the new customer a compelling reason to return? All too often we are too transactional and don't spend enough time establishing relationships.  Make every effort to spend time with each customer and ESPECIALLY with first time customers. Its the relationship not salesmanship that builds a company!
  3. Are you booking your customer’s next vehicle appointment?  Please don’t tell me this does not work. It does!  Hairdressers do it, doctors do it, dentists do it, nail salons do it. My chimney cleaning service company evens books the next chimney cleaning!  If you are not booking your customer’s next visit, trust me, someone else will.

I hope this makes sense. What are your thoughts? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Topics

    • By JeffPMR
      Hi guys, first time posting to the forums.
      I am a new shop owner, recently purchased an A/C machine.
      Do you guys have standard pricing you follow? Pricing for leak checks, price per pound of refrigerant, top up if required? Let me know your A/C pricing matrix. Thanks so much for the help!
    • By Joe Marconi
      I know none of us wants to hear this, but there will be a next crisis of some sort.  I have lived through many downturns in my 40 years in business, the COVID-19 was the worst.  But, out of every crisis comes lessons to be learned. So create your Crisis Plan today. 
      Start by understanding your numbers and knowing your breakeven.  Then add to your breakeven a percentage of profit you want to earn. Equally important is creating a cash reserve in a dedicated bank account that will be used only in a severe emergency.  Set your financial goals and stick to them! 
      Often overlook is your staff. Assemble the best team around you.  This is a crucial part to ensure your future business sucess.
      Lower your debt, get your credit rating up and maintain a good standing with all vendors.  Lastly, talk to your bank about a line of credit that can remain inactive until you need to use it.
      What other key things can we all share to help us through the next crisis?  
    • By Joe Marconi
      As part of our debt reduction, I revamped all of our usual marketing and advertising and put those dollars into customer service and social media. For example, we ramped up our shuttle pickup and delivery service, extended our hours of service, made sure we spend a lot of time with each customer and made sure we called as many customers as possible.  We also stepped up our meet and greet process and made sure will followed up with customer after the repair. Lastly, we increased our social media posts and increases ads and boosting. This has made a huge impact on our customer and already starting to pay dividends.
      What changes have you made to your marketing strategy since the Virus Crisis hit?
    • By Jeremy Glassco
      I get asked this many times.  How would I use a custom mobile app if I had one for my shop?
      Take a moment to think about that.
      Imagine what you could do IF you had a custom mobile app for your vehicle owner customers to download, interact with, and engage with your brand?
      I'm noticing this trend in the food industry, retail industry, and now even in the medical industry.
      What about our auto repair industry niche?
      We're working on version 7.3, and part of what I love to do is get great feedback and build it into our upcoming versions.
      What about you.
      What type of features would an auto repair professional like yourself want in your dream app?
      Please share your ideas here and my hard working team of app gurus will get on it!
    • By spanner
      Hi all, 
      First time poster and glad to be here.
      I'm a 40 something entrepreneur not currently in the auto repair business but I've been exploring shop ownership for several years.
      Unfortunately, I've come up short using traditional business brokers to find a shop worth purchasing. To date, all that I've looked at have been overpriced and/or have some serious issues.
      As shop owners and managers, do you have any tips for finding a solid, well-run general auto repair shop (EBITDA/SDE of $250k-$2MM) to acquire?
      I would be grateful for any insights.
      Thanks,
      Mike


  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By Joe Marconi
      Usually the winter drops off in sales, but along with car counts.  This year is different.  Customers seem consumed with debt and worried about thier finances, and putting off needed vehicle maintenance.  Not good.  In the long run this leads to breakdowns and larger repair bills. 
    • By Joe Marconi
      This is not new topic for me, but I need to revisit it again. And I will keep revisiting this topic for the sake of our industry. 
      For independent repair shops to "thrive" today, you must take a proactive approach with regard to business.  If you only want to "survive" you can stop reading now.
      Waiting for the phone to ring, or for cars to breakdown, or for a customer to drive into your shop asking for a repair or service is business suicide. The days of broken cars lining up in front of your bays are over.  Sure, cars still breakdown, but you cannot thrive with a wait-and-see strategy.
      Make sure you perform multipoint inspections on all cars in for any type of service. Yes, any type of service or repair.  Look up vehicle history on all vehicles. Let the customer know of needed services, missed services and services due. And lastly, book the next appointment.   Yes, I know....Joe's been preaching this over and over and it does not work in your shop. Fine, then let me focus on those shops that do book the next appointment.  Because those are the shops that are adopting a proactive approach...and I will see those shops in the future.
       
       
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      Back in the late 1990’s, I began to get concerned about car counts and customer retention. Around that time, cars were beginning to become more reliable and many of the services and tune up components we once counted on, were going away.
      I also started to notice that many customers were going to the quick lubes for their oil changes.  To be honest, I couldn’t blame them.  There was a time when I did not offer any “wait” service and I was never concerned about the oil change business.
      That all changed.  I began an all-out blitz to get my customers coming back to me for their next oil change.  I especially made it a point to inform customers of their next appointment when we did not due their last oil change.  I just informed them of their next service date and made sure they received a service reminder. 
      The plan took time, but it worked. It increased car counts and customer retention improved. We still use this strategy to this day.
      Make sure you speak to all customers at car delivery about their next service. Book it in your calendar.  And if the car was not in for an oil change, check the oil sticker, enter the date in your CRM reminder system, and assume that the customer wants to return to you.
      We need to be proactive these days. We cannot wait for the phone to ring, we have to make it ring!
    • By Elite Worldwide Inc.
      By Bob Cooper
       
      We all know that there are many things you can do when it comes to customer retention. Follow-up calls, sending out service reminder notices, ongoing advertising campaigns that keep your name at the top of the customer’s mind, and scheduling the next visit at the time of car delivery are just a few. Yet there are some timeless rules that are often forgotten. During these competitive times I feel I can best help you by reminding you of the 6 most important rules when it comes to customer retention.
       
      Rule #1. Create a principle-centered culture. All great companies realize that getting to the top, and staying at the top, is dependent on having a culture that is based on principles. As a business owner you need to ensure that you have a clearly defined Mission Statement, you need to share it with all of your employees, and you need to constantly keep it at the forefront of their minds. Remember, your “goals” are what you are going to accomplish, whereas your Mission Statement is what you will be doing along the way. For example, a Mission Statement could read, “It is the mission of Elite Auto Service to deliver extraordinary service to our customers and opportunity to our employees, while never compromising our ethics or our responsibility to society.”
       
      Rule #2. Offer and deliver a good value. I am not suggesting that you be the lowest priced, or the highest priced in your community. What I am suggesting is that you deliver a good value in return for the money you charge. Companies that charge more than they should just because they can typically discover that their profits will go up in the short term, but that they lose their customer base at the same time. Great companies are competitive, not greedy, and that is why they become, and remain, great companies.
       
      Rule #3. Hire the Superstars. The success of your company, and your ability to retain customers over the years, will be dependent on the people who work with you. As I am sure you will agree, just being good is no longer good enough, so you need to have employees who truly are superstars. I can only hope you bear in mind that whenever someone buys a product, they will always remember the product, but whenever they buy a service, they will always remember the people providing the service. Simply put, your customers’ impression of your business will only be as positive as their impression of the people who work with you.
       
      Rule #4. Provide consistency in the experience. Great companies such as McDonald’s, Starbucks and Nordstrom all understand the importance of consistency in service. With any of these companies, before you step into their stores you already have an expectation of what the experience will be. The top shops understand this rule, and that is why they have clearly defined procedures for everything they do, from handling the first-time caller, through car delivery. When customers feel there is no consistency in service, they will typically look for an alternative service provider.
       
      Rule #5. Deliver on your promises. Hopefully you can see how this rule ties into your Mission Statement. If you want your customers to continue to return, then make sure that all of your employees choose their words carefully when they are making a commitment to your customers, and then ensure they move the earth to deliver on those promises.
       
      Rule #6. Never put money ahead of people. All world-class business owners understand that money is the result of doing the right things for the right reasons. When you embrace this rule you will also discover why the world-class businesses will never take their customers for granted. They understand that it’s the trust their customers have in them and their people that is priceless, not their credit cards.
       
      In closing, there are a number of things you can do to improve your customer retention, but the one promise I can make you is this: These 6 rules are timeless ones, and if you apply them to your business, you will not only see more repeat customers, but unlike your competitors, you will be building a business that will last for generations to come.
       
      Since 1990, Bob Cooper has been the president of Elite, a company that strives to help shop owners reach their goals and live happier lives, while elevating the industry at the same time. The company offers one-on-one coaching from the industry’s top shop owners, service advisor training, peer groups, along with sales, marketing and shop management courses. To learn more about Elite, visit www.EliteWorldwide.com.
       
  • AutoShopOwner Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...