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So it only happens about 3 or so times a year, but every once in a while we get a bad check. Out of the 3 or 4 bad checks, 1 or 2 are an honest mistake and gets corrected immediately with cash or CC. How many shops out there are operating as a cash or CC only business? I've thought about it many of times, but it's hard to make that change when we have a lot of customers come in and write $1,000+ good checks. 

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We take checks all the time. If I hadn't looked, I would have said we take 3 or 4 NSF checks a year. But I just checked and we have taken only 1 in the last 4 years!! It seems like people just don't bounce checks as much as they used to. We do have a few restrictions though. Unless it's a customer we know, we don't take checks that are written on a bank out of our county. Secondly, we limit 1st time customers to $500. Thirdly, we don't take "starter" checks. Lastly, if it is a first time customer, we make a copy of the check and driver's license together and keep it until the check clears.

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We don’t take checks. No reason to nowadays unless they need to float it till Friday. It seems mostly elderly people want to use checks. I am sure they do bc it’s what they are used to it, but they are fine with debit cards when we ask for it instead of a check.


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Problems with checks were more common years ago when checks were more common. We still accept checks from customers that we know and because of that restriction we have not had a problem for many years. The expectations of the general public for us to accept a check has diminished over the years due to the overwhelming prevalence of credit cards. 

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We take checks regularly and don't get any coming back. We give a 2% discount for checks or cash so we're giving the credit card processing fees to the customer instead of the bank. Maybe the goodwill helps to make them think before they write it.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I only accepted checks my first 6 months in business. I got burned on some checks, then made payment policy NO checks. . . . Seven years later its been no problem.  I just inform customers of the payment policy and I have no trouble. And I always get paid with this policy.

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  • 2 months later...

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
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