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As we close the first quarter of 2017, it’s time to review our strategies and goals.  Did we hit the mark? Did we achieve our goals? These are some of the questions we will ask ourselves.  Business planning and looking forward is something that all shop owners must do.  We review data, make projections and set goals.  But, there are times when adjustments must be made to any set of objectives. Why? Life has a way of getting in the way at times.

In the world of business, there is one thing you can count on: Everything changes over time.  Think of it this way.  You plan a road trip across the country.  You plot out the number of hours per day you will be driving, where you will stop, times for rest and refueling, etc.  On day two, you hit a pothole and damage a tire; putting you behind by half a day. On the third day, unexpected construction forces you to make a detour. This also puts you behind a half a day.  The takeaway: There will always be things in life that will test your resolve and force you to readjust and realign your plans. Business is no different. 

Create your strategy, create clearly defined written goals. But know that life does get in the way at times. So be prepared to make course corrections on your journey.

 

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