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HarrytheCarGeek

Charge Administrative Fees!

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Stop subsidising other industries and charge your administrative fees!

 

For example if you do towing and you have to write out a check to pay towing fees to other providers, charge an administrative fee.

 

Data entry, getting all details correctly and chasing down paper costs money. We charge a $25 to $35 fee depending how much time the clerk has to spend working on the case.

 

You should have a line on your billing system so your clerk automatically ads the admin fee when they process the payout to the other service provider.

Edited by HarrytheCarGeek
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