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Joe Marconi

Want to motivate your employees? Give positive feedback

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Perhaps one of the best ways to motivate employees is to give them regular positive feedback. Too often, employees only hear when things go wrong. And while we all need to know when we fail, it’s more important to recognize when things go right. People want to know when they win.


People also like to be included in on the progress of the company. It’s important that everyone in your shop feels that what they do really matters to the success of the company. This also promotes the right culture and builds a strong team.


Create a strategy where you give your employees feedback on their progress, especially positive feedback. Look for things you can point out that recognizes an action by an employee that resulted in recent success. This will help to reinforce the behavior you are looking for and will increase the odds of repeating that same behavior.


The feeling of accomplishment and being recognized for it is a powerful motivator in the workplace, perhaps stronger than money. People want to feel good about themselves. As shop owners, implement this strategy and ignite your workplace toward success.


Remember, your success is dependent on the success of the people around.




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      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
    • By Joe Marconi
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    • By Joe Marconi
      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
    • By Joe Marconi
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      After the meeting, one of my service advisors told me that half of the employees did not agree with me.  When I asked why did they agree, he replied. “You’re the boss, you intimidate others.”

      This made me think about my leadership style.  Being unapproachable will prevent you from hearing other opinions; which is important to the success of the company.

      When speaking with your employees, ask a lot of questions. Avoid giving your opinion until you have heard from others.  Praise suggestions and the opinions of others, and thank others for speaking up.

      The most successful teams are those that build strategies through a collective effort.


       
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