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One of the best things ive discovered for driving traffic is Boosting a post on my business facebook page. While some or most may have seen the option to boost a post, Have you done it? My phone rings off the hook when I have certain tire specials going on, Or just a post for auto repair in general. I probably spend more than I should, Still working on making it efficient, But I do see results. Anyone else doing this? Feel free to share.

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