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  • Similar Forum Topics

    • How Do You Keep Track Of Keys

      This may be an odd topic but with the right strategies you can help workflow and prevent lost or misplaced keys. one of the most annoying things, other than that misplaced 10mm socket, is when you misplace a key. Customer hands you key > place tag on key> place invoice and key in hanging plastic order> place on workflow rack(or hand to technician)> tech pulls car in> I prefer if a car is in the bay to have the key on the seat with the window rolled down(to prevent lockout) or have the key in the hanging plastic invoice holder hanging on the mirror> Vehicle finished and key makes its way back to front office> then given to customer. This seems like a logical workflow. However my concern is what do you do with keys when cars stay overnight? If the vehicle is parked outside, Do you put them in a Safe/Lock box? Drawer? If the vehicle is parked inside and is currently being worked on, do you leave the key in the car? hanging holder on the mirror? Safe/Lock box?     

      By [email protected], in Workflow Management

      • 3 replies
      • 461 views
    • Article: Let's Make A Deal! For some, car repair is all about cutting a deal...NOT...quality of the workmanship

      LET’S MAKE A DEAL           You know everyone wants a deal, something  cheaper, something “thrown in” to sweeten the pot.   Money (as always) is always the driving force, and I don’t think that will ever change.  A deal is  a deal, but if you can’t make a deal… well, then,  deal with it.            One bright morning, a mid-90’s Subaru showed  up at the shop on the back of a wrecker. It’s one  of my regular customer’s young teenager’s car.   The phone rang, it was the dad,  Oh, and did he have a story  to tell… a real whopper of a story.              “My son told me he was driving along when the car bumped the curb and flattened two tires.  I haven’t seen the car, but my son said there wasn’t any real damage. So, I don’t think it should take you very long to get it back on the road.  Do what you can, and call me with the estimate.”           I only saw the driver’s side of the car when the tow truck pulled up.  The tow driver came in and tells me, “Wherever you put this, you won’t be able to move it again.  You’ll have to drag it or put it on “dollies”, it’s pretty messed up.  If I were you, I’d stick it directly on the lift.”          Ok, ya got me, no real damage aye?  But, the tow driver tells me differently… now I’ve got to go look for myself.          No real damage?  Hmmm, let’s see…the whole passenger side of the car looks like someone tried to peel the sheet metal off with a can opener.  Underneath the car was even worse.  The upper and lower passenger side control arms are bent. The wheel, spindle, and tire are sitting on the oil pan area.  The sway bar looks like a pretzel, both rims on the passenger side are beyond reuse, the tires are torn apart and shards of rubber are peeling off of the steel belts, and the transmission has been ripped off its mounts.             Yea, you’re right……he just bumped the curb……..yea sure he did.  Looks more like he rode the edge of the curb like a bucking bronco for a long-long way.  My guess is somebody was trying to drift around corners or slide it sideways with the emergency brake on, and probably took out every bus stop, park bench, and light pole for a block or two.            Ok, the tow driver gets a “thumbs up” on this one; let’s put it on the lift.            I told the customer what I had found and the estimate for the repair, and as always I let him know about any “hidden” problems that might be lurking under all this stuff.  He was not a shocked as I thought he would be even after I gave him the price for all the work that needed done, but definitely concerned.  He kept hinting around as to what I thought might have caused the problem.             From the conversation on the phone he was hoping I would say something like… mechanical failure, slick road conditions, defective part, or something like that.  The farthest thing in his mind was that the kid might be the problem.  I told him what I thought had happened, he didn’t want to believe it, but he was going to check into to it.  In the mean time, order the parts and start getting it ready to get back on the road.           Several days later all the parts showed up, and I could get a better idea of the damage with parts that weren’t bent like a pretzel. It wasn’t long before I found a few more flaws in the little “Scooby-do”, nothing major but the kind of thing that should be replaced.  The extra parts were just a few brackets that were bent, but I knew dad’s pocket book was getting tight.  His main concern now was how much I was willing to chew off the original bill to help him out, and to my surprise he confirmed my suspicions as to what caused the accident.           Oh yea, the kid was trying to drift the Subaru. (DAH! Now how do ya drift a front wheel drive car… ah, slide with the e-brake???)           Now I can do a lot of things, and lower repair costs in order to save the customer money is one of them.   Money, or not, I think there is a lesson to be learned here.  I thought it was appropriate to make a small request to good old dad.  If he wanted a cut on the price of the job, then let’s make a deal.   “You bring the little ridge runner to the shop dressed for work. He can earn his keep and save you a few bucks in the process.   Maybe even take a different approach to driving in the future,” I told the dad.    My customer was a little taken back by my deal to save him some money, but it sounded like a good idea. Now his only job was to get the lad down to the shop ready to fulfill his part of the bargain.   Work stopped until I heard back from him. In the mean time, the car is stuck on the lift with no wheels and only half a suspension.  With a service bay tied up, it’s starting to cost me money.  2 days go by, then 4 more, another week and still no answer.           Finally on a Monday morning when I reached the point where I wasn’t going to wait any longer… the dad calls, “Just fix it, and call me when it’s ready.  My son doesn’t want to do it, and I’m not having much luck in getting him to your shop to help at all.  So I guess I’ll have to deal with the cost of the repair instead.”   A little different deal than I expected.  Well, a deal is a deal.  I’ll handle my end of the bargain, and old dad has decided on how to handle his.    There’s an old saying that comes to mind, it goes like this;    “If you want to save a dollar … do the job yourself, but if you have to pay someone else to do it… don’t ask for cheap work, unless you’re willing to share the cost in some way.”     After another day of getting everything back into place the car was ready for the road again. Sure there are few battle scars still showing, but mechanically the car is in great shape.            That only leaves one more deal that’s not quite finished.             …  … the father needs to deal with the son. . . . 
      View full article

      By Gonzo, in AutoShopOwner Articles

      • 2 replies
      • 285 views
    • How do you keep track of employee hours?

      Hello all, We currently pay our techs by the hour until business starts to pick up on mechanic jobs. Techs normally get a 1 hr lunch break (no paid). However, we have noticed that techs are leaving early and showing up late. As an off site owner, I find it difficult to keep track of hours, and would not like to pay for hours techs are not there. We have tried to use the honor system; however, may times techs are "forgetting" to note time in an out on the calendar.    Any suggestions? Do you use an electronic clocking in an out system? Have the manager in charge do it?   Thanks in advance for your thoughts and opinions.   Regards, Nick 

      By CAautogroup, in Auto Repair Shop Management Help? Post Here!

      • 11 replies
      • 1,037 views
    • [WEBINAR] Make 2018 Your Best Year Ever

      Dear Shop Owner,  Ron Ipach (a.k.a. Captain Car Count) would like to finally share with you his proven 4-step process that he's secretly been teaching to his private auto repair shop clients for the past 21 years, that’ll practically guarantee 2018 to be a blow-out success for you. It’s January and that means the new year has kicked off in a big way. Even though we're only a few weeks in, hopefully you’re well on your way to having another fantastic year. Now, as an Auto Repair Shop Owner, it’s time to start thinking about how to make 2018 an EVEN BETTER year than last. (Heck, let’s go ahead and plan on making it your best year ever! Right?) Ipach, often referred to as the industry's expert when it comes to Car Count, is now accepting registrants to...  
      NEW WEBINAR ANNOUNCEMENT
      MAKE 2018 YOUR BEST YEAR EVER:     1. Magnetically attract more (and even better!) customers to your shop 2. Easily sell your services at higher prices than your competitors 3. Increase your take-home pay by 30%, 50%, or more 4. Find, hire, and keep that elusive tech you’ve been searching for    

      By Ron Ipach, in Shop Management Coaching, Business Training, Consulting

        
      • 1 reply
      • 339 views
    • Discover How To Make 2018 Your Best Year Ever [WEBINAR]

      Hey Shop Owners, It’s December and that means the year is almost over. Even though we only have about four weeks left, I hope you’re well on your way to having another fantastic year. Now… it’s time to start thinking about how to make 2018 an EVEN BETTER year. (Heck, let’s go ahead and plan on making it your best year ever! Right?) I’d like to invite you to a very special LIVE webinar where I’m going to reveal to you for the very first time, my proven 4-step process that I’ve secretly been teaching to my private auto repair shop clients for the past 21 years, that’ll practically guarantee 2018 to be a blow-out success for you. With these four steps, you’ll be able to… Magnetically attract more (and even better!) customers to your shop Easily sell your services at higher prices than your competitors Increase your take-home pay by 30%, 50%, or more Find, hire, and keep that elusive tech you’ve been searching for Put the fun back into running your shop! Interested? Great. There is zero cost to attend this live training and you won’t even have to leave the shop. All you need to do is set aside about 45 minutes of your day to join me right here online. Next week, I’ll be hosting this webinar twice. Once during the day. Once in the evening. That way, you’re sure to be able to find the time to join me.   For the dates, times, and registration details, CLICK HERE.   I hope you’ll join me, Ron Ipach, President Of Repair Shop Coach  

      By Ron Ipach, in Shop Management Coaching, Business Training, Consulting

        
      • 0 replies
      • 437 views
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