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Just wanted to know if anybody worked with companies that drive phone calls from prospective customers. What were the bad things, were there any benefits, what would you like to change, etc.

 

Were prices any good, was it really worth it? Were calls relevant, targeted good enough?

 

 

Thank you!

D

 

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