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In 35 years in business, I have never had a winter like this. In total, we lost about 2 weeks’ worth of sales. And, I know that I am not alone. There are many other shops with similar loses. So, the question is, “Can you make up for lost sales?”

 

I really don’t have a clear answer. One thing I do know; with what it takes to be in business these days, we need to do a better job at planning for downturns. Whether is due to winter storms or other reasons.

 

I also know that we need to set aside a budget that can be used during any downturn.

 

But, this strategy only addresses the loss. Putting away money to use on a “rainy” day is fine, but it does not make up for lost sales.

 

We need to rethink what we need to make during the good months, to maximize sales and profits.

 

Your thoughts?

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