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Driving to work yesterday was like driving through a road that was recently shelled with bombs. Because of the severe winter, potholes and damaged roads are a big problem. But let’s face it, there are a lot of other people that are driving on these road. And, a lot of them are our customers. In fact, unless someone’s car was parked for the last 2 months, just about every car will need to get inspected for winter-related damage.

 

Now, I don’t want to sound like Dr. Evil and wish bad things on anyone, but the fact is that we are already seeing pothole-related damaged cars. Damaged tires, wheels, suspension, steering, wheel alignment and other damage.

 

If your shop suffered through 2 rotten months of bad weather, do yourself and your customer a favor and inspect each car for winter-related damage. The opportunities are there.

 

You owe it to your customer and to your bottom line!

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