Quantcast
Jump to content


How do you handle alignments?


Recommended Posts

Since I have been offering alignments as a service it has been mixed results. Typical instance is a customer will want to schedule an appointment for an alignment. We will advise them over the phone that we have to inspect the suspension and steering systems to make sure we can perform a proper alignment. Vehicles in NYC are beat to hell with the roads the way they are. Many times unless it is a very new vehicle or a vehicle with low mileage there will be things that the vehicle needs. All this is disclosed to the customer BEFORE any work is done. We also explain to them at the there is no charge for this inspection if we go ahead and perform the alignment OR we perform the recommended work and the alignment however this is a $39.97 inspection charge otherwise. Of course they agree. We check out the car and at times we get the work and perform the alignment. Other times we explain to the customer we cannot perform the alignment and would not be in their best benefit. The customer leaves and that is the end of that. Most of the time these customers who decline any further work simply take it to a hack who will align the vehicle to a better spec than it was and then we look like crooks in the eyes of the customer. The reason I bring this up is rarely do we have unhappy customers. I just got a unsubscribe to our e-mail list and reason was "Unhappy with the service." I check the history and we had only seen the vehicle once before and it was for an alignment. There were problems noted down in their repair order with their suspension. The customer left and never to be seen again.

 

I feel like I get far more frequency of situations like this.

 

Are we not attracting the right customers when it comes to alignments? Should I not even offer alignments other than to our regular customers? Should I take a different approach when it comes to booking alignment jobs? No amount of educating the customer seems to work on these people. It is apparently set in their minds that they can get an alignment we are just out to get them.

 

It really gets on my nerves to say the least. I do everything in my power to not take on the problem customer or problem jobs and I feel like I am getting really good at it. The alignment situation seems to be my biggest challenge when it comes to these unwanted customers.

 

Maybe the I am just bitter about the message of "unhappy with the service" when we were up front, gracious and were 110% honest.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since half the battle is getting people in the door, Why not just put it on the rack. Then discuss any problems you find. Show the customer, and let them decide. Good as you can get it or proper repair and align. Then note refused repairs on invoice.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since half the battle is getting people in the door, Why not just put it on the rack. Then discuss any problems you find. Show the customer, and let them decide. Good as you can get it or proper repair and align. Then note refused repairs on invoice.

 

That is exactly what we do. When we refuse to align due to bad suspension or steering components apparently that is something that is unacceptable to some people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What we explain to people is that if we try to align it under those conditions they are throwing their money away. AS soon as the suspect part moves the alignment is no good. We do not want to waste their money.

yup, I say the same thing. I act as the SA here and while I'll never say I am great, I am very very good at connecting with my customers. It just seems that alignment customers are not the type that follow what I say. They will nod as if they agree, say they need to schedule another day to come in to get the work done then go off somewhere else to get the alignment sorted and we end up being the crooks because a hack aligned their vehicle without dealing with the suspension/steering issues. Of course this doesn't happen all the time but definitely a lot more frequently than I am comfortable with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This raises a lot of questions for me. I have tried to implement a process in which our general service tech takes any car that has been left with us and does a quick alignment check. The nice pictorial report is then included in our courtesy check results. The policy never seems to take hold. We are always too busy or whatever, so I watch my alignment rack sit idle. I'm lucky if I do five alignments a week and all of those are associated with a repair like a steering rack, tie rod end, etc. We very seldom sell alignment as a service.

 

What are other shops doing as far as alignments as a percentage of car count?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

flacvabeach, our alignment car count is low as well. This is probably in part due to facility utilization (I've had a lot of dead cars around) and the alignment rack being blocked in at times, alignment rack in the back of the shop, not being confident with my equipment. I am currently looking into upgrading my aligner to the newest Hunter unit and also moving my rack closer to the front of the shop. One thing I have done that has help stave off the unwanted customers is I have increased our charge on alignments significantly ($120 to $176). I may still run alignment specials just to see if I can attract and convert some customers however if I still experience the same problem where our efforts are netting negative results.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I have noticed is being "competitive" with alignment pricing got me the exact customers I didn't want. Sure they drove German cars but they were bottom dollar seekers. My philosophy is I cannot afford dissatisfied customers and I avoid negative reviews like the plague. Very deflating to think about because when I made the investment in the aligner we have I thought it would be a really great move for us. When and if I do move the rack and get a new aligner I really hope that I can profit from it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sub out our alignments. Going price is $49.95 at 4 shops within two miles of me. I have a speciality shop around the corner that aligns out cars for $30. I can't justify the cost of the machine for what he charges.

 

I have a shop that I sub out to from time to time that does alignments for $50 with brand new hunter equipment. Problem is its a 2 man process to drop off and pick up. When you work out the numbers its not as lucrative as you think. Besides that anything I let leave out of my shop opens myself up to an opportunity to lose a customer or their confidence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

That is exactly what we do. When we refuse to align due to bad suspension or steering components apparently that is something that is unacceptable to some people.

I think this is where the problem lies. ( When we refuse to.) Look at it from the customers side. I have X amount of dollars to spend. They want X amount above that to even do What was asked.

 

So for X amount (1/2 price) I can set the toe and center the steering wheel as close as we can get it. It will not be right but it will be better.

 

That gives them choices. Now they feel you want to help, even if its not 100%. They are aware of the additional problems and should leave with an estimate and an appointment.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is where the problem lies. ( When we refuse to.) Look at it from the customers side. I have X amount of dollars to spend. They want X amount above that to even do What was asked.

 

So for X amount (1/2 price) I can set the toe and center the steering wheel as close as we can get it. It will not be right but it will be better.

 

That gives them choices. Now they feel you want to help, even if its not 100%. They are aware of the additional problems and should leave with an estimate and an appointment.

 

That is a great point. I am of the philosophy if we cant do it right dont do it at all. I guess we can offer to try to set it as straight as possible. I will try this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think "show and tell" is the way to go. Get that fresh steel on the rack and inspect it, like any other situation or repair. Show the owner the offending parts and explain if it's not tight, the alignment will NOT hold and it is a waste of time and money. Educate and inform your clients, they will appreciate your candor and you will sell plenty of repair and alignments. Lose the bottom feeder Euro Car crowd. You said "My philosophy is I cannot afford dissatisfied customers and I avoid negative reviews like the plague." Be selective who you take as a client, and bid the bottom feeders good riddance. Let these folks go to your competition, and I say that is a win-win. YOU decide who your clients are!

Edited by Shopcat
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think "show and tell" is the way to go. Get that fresh steel on the rack and inspect it, like any other situation or repair. Show the owner the offending parts and explain if it's not tight, the alignment will NOT hold and it is a waste of time and money. Educate and inform your clients, they will appreciate your candor and you will sell plenty of repair and alignments. Lose the bottom feeder Euro Car crowd. You said "My philosophy is I cannot afford dissatisfied customers and I avoid negative reviews like the plague." Be selective who you take as a client, and bid the bottom feeders good riddance. Let these folks go to your competition, and I say that is a win-win. YOU decide who your clients are!

Edited by Shopcat
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think "show and tell" is the way to go. Get that fresh steel on the rack and inspect it, like any other situation or repair. Show the owner the offending parts and explain if it's not tight, the alignment will NOT hold and it is a waste of time and money. Educate and inform your clients, they will appreciate your candor and you will sell plenty of repair and alignments. Lose the bottom feeder Euro Car crowd. You said "My philosophy is I cannot afford dissatisfied customers and I avoid negative reviews like the plague." Be selective who you take as a client, and bid the bottom feeders good riddance. Let these folks go to your competition, and I say that is a win-win. YOU decide who your clients are!

Edited by Shopcat
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think "show and tell" is the way to go. Get that fresh steel on the rack and inspect it, like any other situation or repair. Show the owner the offending parts and explain if it's not tight, the alignment will NOT hold and it is a waste of time and money. Educate and inform your clients, they will appreciate your candor and you will sell plenty of repair and alignments. Lose the bottom feeder Euro Car crowd. You said "My philosophy is I cannot afford dissatisfied customers and I avoid negative reviews like the plague." Be selective who you take as a client, and bid the bottom feeders good riddance. Let these go folks go to your competition, and I say that is a win-win. YOU decide who your clients are!

 

 

Sometimes you just can't tell. Before I implemented digital inspections I've had customers in the shop under the car an shown why we didn't want to perform an alignment. No matter what you say or do SOME people want it their way and their way only. I have just seen a very unusual concentration of that crowd when it comes to alignments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We charge $65 for alignments, if they ask we do it. Once on the rack if we find bald tires or loose suspension parts I do up an estimate and call the customer. If they insist that they just want it good enough I try my hardest to explain the reality. I was tired one day and lined up a guys Benz, cords coming through the tires. He didn't want to listen so I lined it up anyway (I must have been really tired in hindsight) and he comes back 20 minutes later "still shakes". Ugh, after he berated me for 20 minutes I refunded his alignment and fired him. You can't fix stupid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My routine is this, and so far it works for us and the customer... When a customer comes in or calls to schedule an alignment, I ask all the usual questions as to why they are requesting this service. This let's them know that 1) Their car and information matters 2) I am understanding the problem, which sometimes isn't even an alignment issue, they just didn't know that, and 3) My tech. knows WHY he's doing it and what to look/watch for.

 

I explain to all customers, if a car comes in and we take the time, tools and technology to check their vehicles and if there are repairs necessary prior to an alignment, and they decline the nec. repairs, there is a $49.00 INSPECTION charge. I am very upfront about this and there is never a dispute. As my husband reminds me, years ago at a seminar he was taught that as a professional you charge for your knowledge, your labor/time and your tool investment. I feel that too many of the post's above don't see the value in their knowledge. I too will never do an alignment if the vehicle needs work and the customer isn't able to pay for that work, on top of the alignment. I also do show & tell whenever possible, I think it's huge to bring a customer back into the shop and let my tech. explain what he has found. The customers who have the time to do this come away with a clear understanding of what's going on. They also understand, because I explained it during setting the appointment, that there is going to be the inspection charge if they can't afford to do a complete repair and alignment. I will provide them with a completed quote, send a thank you card and I'd say that 6 out of 10, budget and prepare for the complete job at another time.

We had to order a new Hunter machine that will be showing up in boxes this week. This new machine is going to cut our alignment time in half, that's more profit in the bank. I am very excited to advertise our new and improved tool, now having to decide about raising our rate. We currently charge $85.00.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Charge for alignment check if the work isn't performed. Don't do alignment if you are not allowed to do it 100%...items up for law suit. You don't need customers who want you to do that anyway. Get more on your rack by offering shop discounts and for dealers. Offer Free assignments with certain repairs....work it in the price. But don't half ass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still don't agree with the thinking of offering discounts. Those customers are short timers and not my choice of clientele.

 

davine4real,>>>> Charge for alignment check if the work isn't performed. Don't do alignment if you are not allowed to do it 100%...items up for law suit. You don't need customers who want you to do that anyway

It only makes complete sense to charge for inspection since a test drive and complete suspension/front end "inspection" was done. Not shops fault it found concerning issues that the customer chose not to have done. A customer is fortunate to find a shop to be honest enough to not just shove a bogus alignment through just to make sure to get more $$.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Still don't agree with the thinking of offering discounts. Those customers are short timers and not my choice of clientele.

 

davine4real,>>>> Charge for alignment check if the work isn't performed. Don't do alignment if you are not allowed to do it 100%...items up for law suit. You don't need customers who want you to do that anyway

It only makes complete sense to charge for inspection since a test drive and complete suspension/front end "inspection" was done. Not shops fault it found concerning issues that the customer chose not to have done. A customer is fortunate to find a shop to be honest enough to not just shove a bogus alignment through just to make sure to get more $$.

 

 

Offering discounts is a business model in which I do not subscribe to.

 

Since I am charging a "premium" price for an alignment my next project is to come up with a benefits list of our alignments. Hopefully if I revamp my approach I will not get the same push back.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Offering discounts is a business model in which I do not subscribe to.

 

Since I am charging a "premium" price for an alignment my next project is to come up with a benefits list of our alignments. Hopefully if I revamp my approach I will not get the same push back.

 

I like that approach, makes for a stronger, more confident looking shop to a potential customer. Kill'em with confidence and pride.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My suggestion would be to stop worrying about a few customer's who say "unhappy with the service" I have many customers who say our prices are too high but the other 90% of my customers believe our prices are fair. I'm not going to entertain changing our prices because of the few that are unhappy with them. If your system of selling alignments is working for you, then I would stick with it and ignore the small percentage of customer's that do not like it.

 

Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By carmcapriotto
      Welcome to another episode of the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosted by Brian and Kim Walker! 
      Today, we have a very special guest, Michael Doherty, who was our exceptional service advisor at Peak Automotive in Apex, North Carolina. 
      Michael has been a pivotal figure in our journey, and we are thrilled to share his insights on customer loyalty and retention. He’ll discuss his unique approach to building lasting client relationships and the importance of genuine care and transparency.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      WorldPac - https://www.wtitraining.com/
      Worldpac STX - https://automotivetrainingevents.com/event/stx/
      Traver Technologies: https://traverconnect.com/
      ShopWare - https://shop-ware.com/
      How To Get In Touch
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected] 
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thank you to our friends at RepairPal for providing you this episode. As shop owners we were part of RepairPal’s Certified network and you can learn more at RepairPal.com/shops.
      Customer loyalty programs are crucial for retaining clients in the auto repair industry. On the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosts Brian and Kim Walker explore this topic with Joe Schindler and Jeff Rudnick. 
      Joe, a shop owner, shares his experiences with loyalty programs, while Jeff from Pit Crew Marketing offers insights on how these programs can significantly benefit automotive shops. 
      This discussion is part of their ongoing series on customer retention. They highlight how personalized rewards, first impressions, and community involvement can build stronger customer relationships, encouraging repeat business and long-term loyalty. These strategies significantly enhance customer satisfaction and drive business growth.
      Show Notes with Timestamps
      The introduction (00:00:03) Introduction of the podcast episode and the topic of customer loyalty programs. Jeff's background in Hawaii (00:01:03) Jeff's background in Hawaii and the discussion about his current location. Defining customer loyalty (00:04:19) Discussion on the definition of customer loyalty and how it is measured. Earning trust and loyalty (00:06:01) The importance of trust in earning customer loyalty and the significance of knowing the customer's intent. First impressions (00:12:00) The impact of the first impression on building customer loyalty and the significance of creating a welcoming environment. Last interaction and lagniappe (00:18:05) The importance of the last interaction with the customer and the concept of providing a little extra (lagniappe) to enhance the customer experience. Community involvement and charity events (00:20:34) The role of community involvement and charity events in creating customer loyalty and building relationships. These are the main topics covered in the podcast episode transcription segment, organized in chronological order with their respective timestamps. Community Involvement Charity (00:22:26) Shop owner's initiative to involve customers in community charity, raising funds and providing incentives for customers. Supporting Little League Teams (00:23:20) Discussion on sponsoring little league teams, the impact on the community, and the importance of community involvement. Seizing Opportunities (00:24:29) Encouragement to shop owners to seize opportunities, think creatively, and take advantage of moments for business growth. Solving Real Problems (00:25:44) Emphasizing the role of marketing in solving real challenges for small businesses and making their lives better. Involvement in the Community (00:27:31) Discussion on the importance of being involved in the community and creating a sense of belonging, impacting marketing positively. Connecting with Customers (00:28:36) Emphasizing the need to connect with customers in a meaningful way, beyond traditional loyalty programs, and the impact on advertising effectiveness. Fundraising Logistics (00:29:46) Exploring the logistics of fundraising, including tools, graphics, and collaboration with marketing companies for seamless integration. Using Rewards for Community Programs (00:36:29) Discussion on customers choosing to use rewards for community programs, the intrinsic value, and setting up guardrails for giving. Launching Shop Programs (00:41:39) The process of launching shop programs, integration with shop management systems, and activating accounts based on customer history. Service Advisor's Role (00:45:37) Reference to a previous episode discussing the service advisor's role in customer retention and the impact of the 1-to-1 service advisor-technician ratio. Joe's thoughtful gifting (00:46:31) Joe explains his thoughtful and considerate gifting strategies to connect with clients and nurture relationships. Partners with systems and processes (00:47:22) Joe emphasizes the importance of having partners with efficient systems and processes to ease the burden on business owners. Inexpensive customer gifts (00:48:37) Joe shares his inexpensive yet impactful gift ideas for customers, including hot chocolate mixers, cookies, and personalized items. Quality over quantity (00:51:20) Joe discusses the significance of giving high-quality, thoughtful gifts over cheap trinkets and the impact it has on customers. Building customer loyalty (00:53:17) Joe emphasizes the importance of little gestures and thoughtful gifts in building customer loyalty and creating a positive impact. Conclusion and contact information (00:54:02) The hosts express gratitude to the guests and provide their contact information for listeners to get in touch.  
      How To Get In Touch
       
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      Pit Crew Marketing
      Schindler's Garage
      Schindler's Garage - see loyalty program posts
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care "As shop owners and management, we want to be productive, we want to follow key metrics, we all need to be in business. We all got to meet our goals, our personal goals as shop owners and management. But at the end of the day, if you're not looking for moments of stress happening in your organization and what you can do from a resource point of view, that's what I see." Frank Leutz emphasizes a customer-centric approach, highlighting the value of simplicity, positive employee work culture, and community involvement. Frank Leutz, Desert Car Car, WrenchNationTV. Frank's previous episodes HERE Show Notes
      The Brakes for Breasts Initiative (00:00:15) An initiative by two shop owners to raise funds for a vaccine for triple negative breast cancer. https://brakesforbreasts.com Early Days of Desert Car Care (00:01:49) Frank Leutz discusses the history and relocation of Desert Car Care in Cave Creek, Arizona. Wrench Nation (00:02:49) Frank Leutz talks about the origins and evolution of Wrench Nation, an automotive lifestyle show. Customer-Centric Service Ideology (00:04:21) Frank Leutz discusses the importance of focusing on making the customer the hero of the service experience. Simplicity in Decision-Making (00:09:28) The significance of keeping business operations simple and the impact of simplicity on leadership and problem-solving. Managing Cynicism in the Industry (00:15:35) Frank Leutz addresses the issue of cynicism in the automotive industry and the importance of coaching and therapy to overcome it. The ideology of leaving a legacy (00:16:41) Discusses the importance of leaving a legacy within the industry and the impact of one's actions on future generations. The importance of attitude and aptitude (00:19:39) Emphasizes the significance of attitude and aptitude in maintaining a healthy work-life balance and the impact on business and personal life. The concept of "night school" and continuous learning (00:20:32) Discusses the idea of continuous learning, seeking training sessions, and the importance of personal and professional development. Fostering a supportive and community-oriented workplace (00:22:02) Highlights the importance of creating a supportive and community-oriented workplace, including team-building activities and supporting employees in personal challenges. Embracing a people-first approach (00:24:46) Stresses the importance of celebrating and supporting people within the organization, fostering a supportive and inclusive environment. Community involvement and giving back (00:28:13) Emphasizes the role of auto shops in the community, giving back, and supporting local initiatives, such as free oil changes for school teachers. The significance of networking and staying connected (00:31:39) Highlights the power of networking and staying connected with industry peers and mentors for personal and professional growth. Mutual Appreciation (00:36:03) Frank and Carm express mutual admiration for each other's contributions to the industry. Property Ownership (00:36:26) Frank shares his excitement about owning commercial real estate for his business, Desert Car Care.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Learn more about NAPA Auto Care and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting https://www.napaonline.com/en/auto-care Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Virtual Toastmasters Club: https://remarkableresults.biz/toastmasters -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      In this episode of the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosts Brian and Kim Walker are joined by Rena Rennebohm to discuss the crucial role of service advisors in customer retention. Part of a customer retention series, this conversation highlights the importance of tailored, one-on-one service advisor training. Key topics include the shop owner's role in setting expectations, the benefits of a one-to-one advisor-to-technician ratio, and common mistakes in advisor interactions. Rena emphasizes the need for clear communication, empathy, and consistent follow-up to build trust and enhance customer loyalty, ultimately driving better business outcomes.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      How To Get In Touch
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      Rena Rennebohm: [email protected]
      Website: empoweryouradvisor.com
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...