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John Pearson

Just what I was looking for.

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I was excited when I found ratchet and wrench, now that I have found this place I am over joyed. I am always looking for new friends that have been there and done it that can help me along my way.

 

I have been working on cars for 6 years for others, 4 years in the army working on helicopters and cars on the side I accidently got in over my head. So I figured the way to fix being up to my eyeballs in work was to move in to a real shop and out of my garage and hire help.

 

We learned a lot on our own, made a lot of mistakes but owned up to them and now we are working 16 hours a day to get all the cars through the 1 lift that we have.

 

We offer everything from oil changes, Tires, A/C, alignments, to aftermarket lifts, Winterizations (its an alaska thing) and standard Diag and repair. The amount of special tools we have bought has been astronomical and now we even have Ford IDS and plan on adding the a few more dealer level tools by the end of the year.

 

I hope to be an asset and learn from the pros about how to run a business fixing cars is easy.

 

 

 

My problem right now is the 1 bay, there is no where to move to, and my money people don't want me to build the building that I want to build that we would grow in to. They recommend half the size and dont want to see us grow to quickly, and I agree. So now I am stuck in between a rock and a hard place.

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