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This has been a record year for automotive factory recalls. Some 40 million cars have been recalled already. And while we would assume that this would have a negative impact on new car dealers, the increased traffic to the dealers has actually helped dealers with new car sales. Below is link for to an interesting article in Aftermarket Business.

 

I wonder how this strategy can be used to our benefit?

 

http://www.searchautoparts.com/aftermarket-business/market-trend-analysis/dealers-look-build-customer-relationships-auto-recalls?cid=95879

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      With business slowing down for most, we feel that there's never been a better time for shops to take advantage of online training. We know that everyone in our great industry is in this together, and want to help shop owners in any and every way that we can, so have decided to team up with Jasper Engines & Transmissions to make our Online High Impact Customer Care Sales Course available to the industry at no charge. 
       
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    • By AutoShopOwner
      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
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      As a growing number of states issue emergency orders to close non-essential businesses, the U.S. government has issued guidance declaring that automotive repair and maintenance are “essential” functions.     
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      For additional information, contact Aaron Lowe, senior vice president, government and regulatory affairs, at [email protected] or Tom Tucker, director, state affairs, at [email protected]
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