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CAautogroup

Customer questions labor hours charged

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Hello all,

 

We recently had a customer question the amount of hours charged to install a part. The customer insisted that we follow what the "book" calls for and nothing more. When we tried to explain to the customer that the book is not always 100% correct on labor hours. He then questioned our expertise in the field stating that he has a "bunch of amateurs working on his vehicle". Wow, really?

 

Its somewhat unpredictable if a bolt will break off, needs to be retread/retapped,or any additional parts that need to be replaced.

 

 

How would you handle a customer like this?

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