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mspecperformance

I think I am finally done with phone shoppers

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I get all kinds of annoying phone calls all day long so maybe I am just a little bit extra agitated over this one particular phone call. Phone shopper calls up asks for our labor rate up front then asks about a particular repair (front window regulator 99 audi a4). Reluctantly I look up a price and give it to him. Of course next question is, "why so much" and "how much is the labor". I tell him the labor cost and he again asks, "whats your labor rate." I try to circumvent the question and explain to him that is the service price we charge. Phone shopper is relentless and keeps asking labor time labor time labor time. I finally cave because I am actually get fed up with the phone conversation and tell him its based off of 1.8 hours. Then his next question is, "Does it really take that long?". Asked about 3x even. Then he asks "how much to just close up the window and close the door." Told him we dont do that and we hung up.

 

Long story short there is no winning with these people. Some phone shoppers you can steer with asking questions like "May I ask where you got it diagnosed?" and go through the myriad of leading questions to get them to bring the car in for an inspection/diag HOWEVER there are just some (a lot) of people that only want one thing (PRICE AND ARE YOU THE CHEAPEST???). For my own sanity I think I will just have a no estimates over the phone policy. Regular menu price items such as oil changes and the like I will give out prices still.

 

Anyone else not give estimates over the phone? How do you handle a customer constantly asking labor rate and labor times?

 

If I had Service Advisors (and when I do!) I will probably have them take a more proactive approach to trying to convert phone shoppers but for my own sanity I think I am just going to tell them sorry no estimates. I think I do a decent job at SA however I have a low tolerance for BS.

 

 

Love to hear some thoughts and funny stories to pick my day up!

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