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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         5 comments
      I recently spoke with a friend of mine who owns a large general repair shop in the Midwest. His father founded the business in 1975. He was telling me that although he’s busy, he’s also very frustrated. When I probed him more about his frustrations, he said that it’s hard to find qualified technicians. My friend employs four technicians and is looking to hire two more. I then asked him, “How long does a technician last working for you.” He looked puzzled and replied, “I never really thought about that, but I can tell that except for one tech, most technicians don’t last working for me longer than a few years.”
      Judging from personal experience as a shop owner and from what I know about the auto repair industry, I can tell you that other than a few exceptions, the turnover rate for technicians in our industry is too high. This makes me think, do we have a technician shortage or a retention problem? Have we done the best we can over the decades to provide great pay plans, benefits packages, great work environments, and the right culture to ensure that the techs we have stay with us?
      Finding and hiring qualified automotive technicians is not a new phenomenon. This problem has been around for as long as I can remember. While we do need to attract people to our industry and provide the necessary training and mentorship, we also need to focus on retention. Having a revolving door and needing to hire techs every few years or so costs your company money. Big money! And that revolving door may be a sign of an even bigger issue: poor leadership, and poor employee management skills.
      Here’s one more thing to consider, for the most part, technicians don’t leave one job to start a new career, they leave one shop as a technician to become a technician at another shop. The reasons why they leave can be debated, but there is one fact that we cannot deny, people don’t quit the company they work for, they usually leave because of the boss or manager they work for.
      Put yourselves in the shoes of your employees. Do you have a workplace that communicates, “We appreciate you and want you to stay!”
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

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    • By carmcapriotto
      In this episode of "Diagnosing the Aftermarket," host Matt Fanslow tackles the issue of motivating technicians to attend training. He shares personal experiences and the sacrifices he made to enhance his skills, acknowledging the difficulty of balancing training with work and family life. Matt discusses the intrinsic motivation required for technicians to seek training and the resistance some may have. He stresses the importance of continuous learning in the automotive industry and invites feedback on the topic.
      Show Notes
      Supporting intrinsically motivated technicians (00:02:18) Challenges of motivating technicians (00:04:23) Exploring potential reasons for technician resistance to training and addressing challenges. (00:05:35) The changing perception of training value over time and the importance of continuous learning. (00:09:09) The impact of training on technician satisfaction, turnover, and shop profitability. (00:10:12) Compensation, travel, and anxiety are factors affecting technician training motivation. (00:14:44) The role of training in career progression and increasing income levels. (00:17:14) Technician's challenges in attending training after work, including family responsibilities and time constraints.  
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Autotech napaautotech.com
       
      Email Matt: [email protected]
      Diagnosing the Aftermarket A - Z YouTube Channel HERE
      Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/
       
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Gerald Martin
      No one loves comebacks.  But they are a part of life.  They come in all shapes and sizes:
      1.  Faulty parts.  We have more part quality issues than ever before, including (less frequently) OEM parts.
      2.  Tech error.   A tech fails to properly tighten brake caliper frame bolts.  A belt is installed with one groove off the edge of a pulley.  Some techs rarely make these errors.  But mistakes will happen.
      3.  Warning lights on or new symptoms noted "ever since you worked on it".   Always needs to be taken seriously - sometimes issues identified are fall into category 1 or 2.  Or further OBD monitors ran since repairs were made and other issues are coming out of the woodwork.  And sometimes people will try to pin every new issue on the shop that last worked on the car.
       
      How do we deal with warranty cases?   
      When tech error is involved, is the employer responsible to pay the tech's time to correct his own mistake?  Does it make a difference if there is a pattern of carelessness?  If the employer picks up the tab for everything, doesn't this reward the making of mistakes?
      It seems reasonable that the tech should not take responsibility for part failures not caused by tech error, doesn't it?
      And what about that follow up scan to see why the warning lights are on?  Should the tech handle this as a courtesy until determined what area the fault is in?  It may be, after all, that he left a vacuum line off the air cleaner box.  But it shouldn't take too long to know if the advisor needs to request more testing approval from the client...
       
      And should any of these questions be influenced by whether the shop pays flat rate or hourly?
      I know that's a lot of questions.  But I hope it starts a conversation, because it's an area we really need to develop an SOP and stick with it.
       
      Gerald
       
    • By carmcapriotto
      George Kingman discusses the importance of work-life balance, psychological safety, and cultivating a positive work environment. He shares personal experiences and lessons learned from his journey in the automotive industry, emphasizing the need for passion and positivity. Kingman also discusses leadership strategies inspired by George Washington and how they can be applied in modern businesses. He stresses the importance of making employees feel valued and connected to their work. George Kingman, Blue Sky Tire and Auto, Georgia and Illinois. Advanced Shop Leadership Show Notes
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      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Joe Marconi

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