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I'm looking at opening an auto repair shop with a partner who is the mechanic and possibly another mechanic. I will be the sole investor in the venture never before been in the auto rapair shop business. I will most likely manage the whole thing. I need lots of help.

 

How are mechanics paid?

How do I pay myself and recoup my investment?

Shop management software? Looked at MaxxTraxx, Alldatapro.

What types of insurance must I carry?

 

I've found a nice place with three bays to rent but will need to install lifts. Should I shop used or new?

Etc etc etc.

 

Thanks for any help you can offer.

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      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To read this post, please login or register for a membership. 
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