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Tell Technician to Stop Coming in Late he says now he's Injured...


Big_K

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So one of our technicians has been slacking off... he was never a hard worker, but we thought we'd give him a chance.

 

He began to habitually come in late, we don't have in a "clock in" system nor a handbook, nor any kind of written procedures. (Something that needs to be worked on)

 

Well, on Monday morning he comes in 20 minutes late, I tell him that he is yet again 20 minutes late and whether he takes his work seriously because I can find someone that will.

 

He comes back with a big attitude about how he bumped his head, and he did it here and now his head hurts. So I had a choice "he can forget that he bumped his head" or "go to the doctor."

 

I sent him to the doctor, this morning he comes in 7 minutes late, goes to the bathroom for 10 minutes. I tell him he's ready for work 17 minutes late. He walks away, I say he needs to show some respect. He says he doesn't since its not in his job description?????

 

I want to just fire him, but workers comp put him on "Modified work" so he can't lift anything about 40 lbs.

 

 

His diagnosing skills are wrong, how do I go about legally firing this guy...I wanted to throw him out after he started giving attitude but didn't want to get an unlawful termination case...seems as though he is baiting us to do it. I am dumbfounded how bad his attitude change as soon as he got verbally warned.

 

 

 

Advice? I want to create a clock-in policy today and install software and have everyone do it. (no one else has trouble with this)

Edited by Big_K
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I just fired a tech for being late. I had reminded him of what time we start he gave me a bs reason he was late. well the next week it wasn't 10min it was 30 the next day he didn't show at all so I sent a friend to go make sure he was ok and to have him call in to the shop. no luck. he would have known that it was his last day he might have showed up. so I had to go under oath for unemployment I contested it and one he admitted to being late and new what time he was supposed to be in. I told the guy off the record that I believe that when your the boss you should have control over your tech's and that if I decide who to hire I can decide who to fire. The guy at unemployment actually agreed with me.

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      Most shop owners would agree that the independent auto repair industry has been too cheap for too long regarding its pricing and labor rates. However, can we keep raising our labor rates and prices until we achieve the profit we desire and need? Is it that simple?
      The first step in achieving your required gross and net profit is understanding your numbers and establishing the correct labor and part margins. The next step is to find your business's inefficiencies that impact high production levels.
      Here are a few things to consider. First, do you have the workflow processes in place that is conducive to high production? What about your shop layout? Do you have all the right tools and equipment? Do you have a continuous training program in place? Are technicians waiting to use a particular scanner or waiting to access information from the shop's workstation computer?
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      Once you have determined the correct labor rate and pricing, review your entire operation. Then, tighten up on all those labor leaks and inefficiencies. Improving production and paying close attention to the labor on each job will add much-needed dollars to your bottom line.
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