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Pjauto

Standard Write Up Form

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Can someone please drop me a standard disciplinary form they use with their employees to help keep a paper trial? I've been open for six month and I am on the way to firing my first guy. He has messed up too many cars by not paying attention and I can't afford to keep him on any longer. You can email it to me @ integrityjack @ gmail. I thought this business ownership thing was supposed to be all fun??!!?? ; P

Thanks in advance for the help.

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Edited by Wes Daniel

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