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Employee stole 11 checks and has been cashing them...


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Never something you want to find out but it has happened. He wrote multiple checks to himself and even his girlfriend. It was a few thousand dollars worth and I've turned it all over to the police. Anyone else have anything like this happen? If so, what was the outcome?

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During the day I'll leave our large book of checks under the counter and apparantly he just grabbed a couple of sheets worth. Didn't know for a few weeks since we mainly use a credit car for our purchases.

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My service manager gave an employee a credit card to get 5 gallons of gas on a Friday and forgot to get it until Tuesday. We found out he charged over $500 worth of stuff including an Xbox.

Wow! Did he come back to work and act like nothing happened?

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Its amazing how stupid people are. Then you bang yourself in the head because you hired them! I've been there, not with stolen money but stolen tools/parts and owed money. Let an employee borrow money and let him also slide on not paying back for damaged property. Ended up getting rid of him and holding the bag for about $2000 worth of money/property. Small price to pay to get the POS out.

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That is a tough situation to have to deal with. It is so hard to trust others, only to have them take advantage of you. You have prompted me to look at our check writing procedures more closely. Hope it all works out quickly.

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Just had $200 stolen from the cash drawer up front the other night. Nothing was broken in to, cops said it seems like an employee. Not a very good feeling in a small shop with 4 guys. Everyone you have known for years. Good Luck, atleast mine was only $200 but I have taken steps to change our money handling procedures.

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      I recently spoke with a friend of mine who owns a large general repair shop in the Midwest. His father founded the business in 1975. He was telling me that although he’s busy, he’s also very frustrated. When I probed him more about his frustrations, he said that it’s hard to find qualified technicians. My friend employs four technicians and is looking to hire two more. I then asked him, “How long does a technician last working for you.” He looked puzzled and replied, “I never really thought about that, but I can tell that except for one tech, most technicians don’t last working for me longer than a few years.”
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