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Last Tuesday I attended a seminar on YouTube marketing. The speaker discussed how creating videos, with the right search engine optimization, can really help your ranking in Google. He gave examples and actually showed us that more and more listing that come up on Google searches have videos, which actually helped that company increase the chances of getting top listing.

I thought it was a real interesting seminar. In terms of the new era of advertising and marketing, it’s a whole new ball game!

 

We have created a few YouTube consumer videos, and in the process of making more. Is anyone else creating videos, and how has it helped? Or not?

 

 

 

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