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Good day to you all!

 

I have been trying to do research in how to financially manage our small business, and came across this site. Been looking around it and reading some real good articles.

 

My husband and I have started our own mechanic shop in Houston Tx. This is our 2nd time giving it a try. Last time we got into it without knowing anything at all about how to run a business. We mutually decided to closed it down and wait till the time was right for us to try again. We both got a job at a repair shop. My husband was working as a mechanic in the shop and I was helping inside the office. We got some experience while working there but not enough.

 

3 years later and here we are again. This time we seen there was an opportunity and we just could not let it go by.

 

On November 22, we will be making one year since we open our small Auto Repair Shop. We are so grateful with all the support that we have been receiving from our community. We have lots of work, and is all by referrals. The only marketing i have done is through Facebook, most of our customers are walk-ins or friends, or family members from people we have done work to their vehicles. We are very happy with the outcome. Our local dealer is even sending us cars for us to work on them and right now their jobs is what is keeping us afloat.

 

Our shop name is Exclusive Auto Care, we have 2 mechanics that work with my husband. Very good guys by the way. I work in the office. I deal with the customers. I get the jobs in, and my husband gets them out. I order parts, deal with estimates and invoices, all that good stuff. I enjoyed what I do and why I do it.

 

Im not so sure that we are doing everything the right way or how we suppose to. Our rate is $80.00/hour. We are the cheapest ones in our area. The rest auto shops charge $90-$100/hour. There is 4 mechanic shops in our same street, regardless of that I dont see them as competitors. We all trying to make a living here, and their reputation is not all that good. We are just happy with any work that we get. We order parts from O'reillys Auto Parts. We get a discount and raise the parts to 0.8% (im not too sure about this percentage) How much do you guys mark up parts? Some times I dont think we make any money on parts. At times the customer rather get their own parts and we are ok with that too. If customer bring parts do you guys offer warranty? How long? We were giving 3 months (90 days) but due to us loosing money we had to make it 30 days only. I am thinking about not offering a warranty for parts that are supply by the customer. Could this be a good decision? Why or why not? I am in desperate need of advice I dont want to see our business fall apart.

 

Thank you so much for taking your time to read my post.

 

Have a good day!

Zulma

 

 

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