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How would you approach introducing your business to other businesses?

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Channeling some more knowledge from the gurus, wanted your take on this guys.

 

Last year we moved to our new location which is about a mile or so from our old location in the neighborhood over. I am located in New York City so being one neighborhood away is almost like being another town over for those who don't live in a big metro area. Anyway I have not really done a great job in making our presence known in the area. Even at my old shop we didn't proactively go out and meet other local businesses and introduce ourselves.

 

I've recently ramped up our "brand recognition" efforts by getting shirts and polos printed up with our logo embroidered. I know probably baby steps for you most of you guys but its little thing we are catching up on now! I've also recently hired a new tech whom is short on common sense but is a wiz at being a theory mechanic and is really a step ahead on the customer service/manners department. Hes from the south so his manners are a breath of fresh air and I have gotten more comments about how much they like my new guy in 2 months than my guys who have been with me for 5+ years!

 

I am basically thinking about taking my new tech on a mini campaign to hand out cards and introduce ourselves with the local business (restaurants, bakeries, cleaners, deli, nail salons, etc). I was also thinking of introducing ourselves with some of the shops in the area. We are German car specialists with a full service shop with tire and alignment capabilities. A lot of shops could potentially be great sources of referrals or farmed out business as a lot of shops don't have alignment machines and the ability to really work on BMW/Mercedes/Audi etc.

 

My question to you folks is what do you think is best way to approach these businesses? Should I send a specific message to them? Do I do more than just give them a few cards? Do I pitch an incentive program?

 

What has worked for you guys?

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