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nmikmik

How to prevent exodus and hopefully hire someone too

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Hi,

I am in a process of purchasing a “functioning” shop where two mechanics (one A and one C) working as a father and son team. I would love to change some things at the shop right away, but know it could be a recipe for disaster. So I am thinking to work with them for a couple of month until they feel more comfortable with me, then start giving them job descriptions/expectations etc.

My nearest goal is to grow the business, so hiring new tech(s) is a must. How do I make the two original techs comfortable with the idea? I suspect they are pretty set in their old ways of not having anyone there. Any suggestions?

Oh, and if you happen to have a set of questions that you usually ask prospective tech employees/candidates, please PM me.

Thanks!

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